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To Share or Not to Share: Malaysian Healthcare Professionals' Views on Localized Prostate Cancer Treatment Decision Making Roles

Overview of attention for article published in PLoS ONE, November 2015
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Mentioned by

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1 tweeter

Citations

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4 Dimensions

Readers on

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44 Mendeley
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Title
To Share or Not to Share: Malaysian Healthcare Professionals' Views on Localized Prostate Cancer Treatment Decision Making Roles
Published in
PLoS ONE, November 2015
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0142812
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yew Kong Lee, Ping Yein Lee, Ai Theng Cheong, Chirk Jenn Ng, Khatijah Lim Abdullah, Teng Aik Ong, Azad Hassan Abdul Razack

Abstract

To explore the views of Malaysian healthcare professionals (HCPs) on stakeholders' decision making roles in localized prostate cancer (PCa) treatment. Qualitative interviews and focus groups were conducted with HCPs treating PCa. Data was analysed using a thematic approach. Four in-depth interviews and three focus group discussions were conducted between December 2012 and March 2013 using a topic guide. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analysed thematically. The participants comprised private urologists (n = 4), government urologists (n = 6), urology trainees (n = 6), government policy maker (n = 1) and oncologists (n = 3). HCP perceptions of the roles of the three parties involved (HCPs, patients, family) included: HCP as the main decision maker, HCP as a guide to patients' decision making, HCP as a facilitator to family involvement, patients as main decision maker and patient prefers HCP to decide. HCPs preferred to share the decision with patients due to equipoise between prostate treatment options. Family culture was important as family members often decided on the patient's treatment due to Malaysia's close-knit family culture. A range of decision making roles were reported by HCPs. It is thus important that stakeholder roles are clarified during PCa treatment decisions. HCPs need to cultivate an awareness of sociocultural norms and family dynamics when supporting non-Western patients in making decisions about PCa.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 44 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 44 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 11 25%
Researcher 7 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 14%
Professor > Associate Professor 3 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 7%
Other 13 30%
Unknown 1 2%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 14 32%
Nursing and Health Professions 12 27%
Social Sciences 5 11%
Computer Science 2 5%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 2 5%
Other 6 14%
Unknown 3 7%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 November 2015.
All research outputs
#3,117,785
of 6,562,576 outputs
Outputs from PLoS ONE
#57,422
of 99,780 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#112,604
of 209,310 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLoS ONE
#3,044
of 5,190 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,562,576 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 29th percentile – i.e., 29% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 99,780 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.8. This one is in the 31st percentile – i.e., 31% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 209,310 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 5,190 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.