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Complex mixtures, complex responses: Assessing pharmaceutical mixtures using field and laboratory approaches

Overview of attention for article published in Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry, November 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (94th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (93rd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
5 news outlets

Citations

dimensions_citation
48 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
108 Mendeley
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Title
Complex mixtures, complex responses: Assessing pharmaceutical mixtures using field and laboratory approaches
Published in
Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry, November 2015
DOI 10.1002/etc.3147
Pubmed ID
Authors

Heiko L. Schoenfuss, Edward T. Furlong, Pat J. Phillips, Tia-Marie Scott, Dana W. Kolpin, Marina Cetkovic-Cvrlje, Kelsey E. Lesteberg, Daniel C. Rearick

Abstract

Pharmaceuticals are present in low concentrations (<100 ng/L) in most municipal wastewater effluents but may be elevated locally because of factors such as input from pharmaceutical formulation facilities. Using existing concentration data, the authors assessed pharmaceuticals in laboratory exposures of fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) and added environmental complexity through effluent exposures. In the laboratory, larval and mature minnows were exposed to a simple opioid mixture (hydrocodone, methadone, and oxycodone), an opioid agonist (tramadol), a muscle relaxant (methocarbamol), a simple antidepressant mixture (fluoxetine, paroxetine, venlafaxine), a sleep aid (temazepam), or a complex mixture of all compounds. Larval minnow response to effluent exposure was not consistent. The 2010 exposures resulted in shorter exposed minnow larvae, whereas the larvae exposed in 2012 exhibited altered escape behavior. Mature minnows exhibited altered hepatosomatic indices, with the strongest effects in females and in mixture exposures. In addition, laboratory-exposed, mature male minnows exposed to all pharmaceuticals (except the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor mixture) defended nest sites less rigorously than fish in the control group. Tramadol or antidepressant mixture exposure resulted in increased splenic T lymphocytes. Only male minnows exposed to whole effluent responded with increased plasma vitellogenin concentrations. Female minnows exposed to pharmaceuticals (except the opioid mixture) had larger livers, likely as a compensatory result of greater prominence of vacuoles in liver hepatocytes. The observed alteration of apical endpoints central to sustaining fish populations confirms that effluents containing waste streams from pharmaceutical formulation facilities can adversely impact fish populations but that the effects may not be temporally consistent. The present study highlights the importance of including diverse biological endpoints spanning levels of biological organization and life stages when assessing contaminant interactions. Environ Toxicol Chem 2015;9999:1-13. © 2015 SETAC.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 108 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 107 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 18 17%
Researcher 18 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 17 16%
Student > Bachelor 12 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 6%
Other 12 11%
Unknown 24 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 23 21%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 14 13%
Engineering 7 6%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 6%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 6 6%
Other 25 23%
Unknown 27 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 38. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 December 2019.
All research outputs
#901,298
of 22,832,057 outputs
Outputs from Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry
#121
of 5,504 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#14,793
of 282,567 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry
#7
of 103 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,832,057 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,504 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 282,567 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 103 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.