↓ Skip to main content

Spatial targeted vector control in the highlands of Burundi and its impact on malaria transmission

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, December 2007
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (68th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (69th percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source

Citations

dimensions_citation
44 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
90 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Spatial targeted vector control in the highlands of Burundi and its impact on malaria transmission
Published in
Malaria Journal, December 2007
DOI 10.1186/1475-2875-6-158
Pubmed ID
Authors

Natacha Protopopoff, Wim Van Bortel, Tanguy Marcotty, Michel Van Herp, Peter Maes, Dismas Baza, Umberto D'Alessandro, Marc Coosemans

Abstract

Prevention of malaria epidemics is a priority for African countries. The 2000 malaria epidemic in Burundi prompted the government to implement measures for preventing future outbreaks. Case management with artemisinin-based combination therapy and malaria surveillance were nationally improved. A vector control programme was initiated in one of the most affected highland provinces. The focal distribution of malaria vectors in the highlands was the starting point for designing a targeted vector control strategy. The objective of this study was to present the results of this strategy on malaria transmission in an African highland region. In Karuzi, in 2002-2005, vector control activities combining indoor residual spraying and long-lasting insecticidal nets were implemented. The interventions were done before the expected malaria transmission period and targeted the valleys between hills, with the expectation that this would also protect the populations living at higher altitudes. The impact on the Anopheles population and on malaria transmission was determined by nine cross-sectional surveys carried out at regular intervals throughout the study period. Anopheles gambiae s.l. and Anopheles funestus represented 95% of the collected anopheline species. In the valleys, where the vector control activities were implemented, Anopheles density was reduced by 82% (95% CI: 69-90). Similarly, transmission was decreased by 90% (95% CI: 63%-97%, p = 0.001). In the sprayed valleys, Anopheles density was further reduced by 79.5% (95% CI: 51.7-91.3, p < 0.001) in the houses with nets as compared to houses without them. No significant impact on vector density and malaria transmission was observed in the hill tops. However, the intervention focused on the high risk areas near the valley floor, where 93% of the vectors are found and 90% of the transmission occurs. Spatial targeted vector control effectively reduced Anopheles density and transmission in this highland district. Bed nets have an additional effect on Anopheles density though this did not translate in an additional impact on transmission. Though no impact was observed in the hilltops, the programme successfully covered the areas most at risk. Such a targeted strategy could prevent the emergence and spread of an epidemic from these high risk foci.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 90 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 2 2%
Senegal 1 1%
Sudan 1 1%
Netherlands 1 1%
Brazil 1 1%
Tanzania, United Republic of 1 1%
Slovakia 1 1%
Belgium 1 1%
Unknown 81 90%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 23 26%
Researcher 22 24%
Student > Master 14 16%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 6%
Student > Bachelor 5 6%
Other 12 13%
Unknown 9 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 25 28%
Medicine and Dentistry 19 21%
Environmental Science 10 11%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 7%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 4%
Other 14 16%
Unknown 12 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 January 2014.
All research outputs
#2,034,060
of 8,079,148 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#956
of 2,836 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#71,474
of 242,467 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#50
of 166 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,079,148 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 61st percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,836 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.9. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 242,467 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 166 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its contemporaries.