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Overview of attention for article published in Genome Biology (Online Edition), January 2000
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (66th percentile)

Mentioned by

wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

dimensions_citation
135 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
96 Mendeley
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Title
Published in
Genome Biology (Online Edition), January 2000
DOI 10.1186/gb-2000-1-1-research002
Pubmed ID
Authors

Irina Smirnova, Alexander Poltorak, Edward KL Chan, Colleen McBride, Bruce Beutler

Abstract

Differences in responses to bacterial surface lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) are apparent between and within mammalian species. It has been shown in mice that resistance to LPS is caused by defects in the Toll-like receptor 4 gene (Tlr4), the product of which is thought to bind LPS and mediate LPS signal transduction in immune system cells. We have sequenced the Toll-like receptor 4 gene of humans (TLR4; 19.0 kilobases, kb) and mice (Tlr4; 91.7 kb), as well as the coding region and splice junctions of Tlr4 from 35 mouse (Mus musculus) strains, from the chimpanzee and from the baboon. No other discernible genes or regions of interspecies conservation lies close to Tlr4 and, in both humans and mice, flanking sequences and introns are rich in repeats of retroviral origin. Interstrain analyses reveal that Tlr4 is a polymorphic protein and that the extracellular domain is far more variable than the cytoplasmic domain, both among strains and among species. The cytoplasmic domain of the Tlr4 protein is highly variable at the carboxy-terminal end. We suggest that selective evolutionary pressure exerted by microbes expressing structurally distinguishable LPS molecules has produced the high level of variability in the Tlr4 extracellular domain. The highly variable carboxy-terminal region of the cytoplasmic domain is likely to determine the magnitude of the response to LPS within a species.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 96 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 2%
United Kingdom 2 2%
Canada 1 1%
Uruguay 1 1%
India 1 1%
Peru 1 1%
Slovenia 1 1%
Argentina 1 1%
Japan 1 1%
Other 1 1%
Unknown 84 88%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 21 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 18 19%
Professor > Associate Professor 11 11%
Professor 11 11%
Student > Master 8 8%
Other 22 23%
Unknown 5 5%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 46 48%
Medicine and Dentistry 18 19%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 13 14%
Immunology and Microbiology 10 10%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 1%
Other 1 1%
Unknown 7 7%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 November 2015.
All research outputs
#3,624,133
of 12,486,858 outputs
Outputs from Genome Biology (Online Edition)
#2,054
of 2,835 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#82,858
of 272,239 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Genome Biology (Online Edition)
#207
of 222 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,486,858 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,835 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 22.9. This one is in the 18th percentile – i.e., 18% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 272,239 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 222 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 6th percentile – i.e., 6% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.