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Pre‐fire drought and competition mediate post‐fire conifer mortality in western U.S. National Parks

Overview of attention for article published in Ecological Applications, August 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (80th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source
twitter
11 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
22 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
70 Mendeley
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Title
Pre‐fire drought and competition mediate post‐fire conifer mortality in western U.S. National Parks
Published in
Ecological Applications, August 2018
DOI 10.1002/eap.1778
Pubmed ID
Authors

Phillip J. van Mantgem, Donald A. Falk, Emma C. Williams, Adrian J. Das, Nathan L. Stephenson

Abstract

Tree mortality is an important outcome of many forest fires. Extensive tree injuries from fire may lead directly to mortality, but environmental and biological stressors may also contribute to tree death. However, there is little evidence showing how the combined effects of two common stressors, drought and competition, influence post-fire mortality. Geographically broad observations of three common western coniferous trees subjected to prescribed fire showed the likelihood of post-fire mortality was related to intermediate-term (10 yr) pre-fire average radial growth, an important component of tree vigor. Path analysis showed that indices of competition and drought stress prior to fire can be described in terms of joint effects on growth, indirectly affecting post-fire mortality. Our results suggest that the conditions that govern the relationship between growth and mortality in unburned stands may also apply to post-fire environments. Thus, biotic and abiotic changes that affect growth negatively (e.g., drought stress) or positively (e.g., growth releases following thinning treatments) prior to fire may influence expressed fire severity, independent of fire intensity (e.g., heat flux, residence time). These relationships suggest that tree mortality may increase under stressful climatic or stand conditions even if fire behavior remains constant.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 11 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 70 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 70 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 19 27%
Student > Ph. D. Student 16 23%
Student > Master 6 9%
Student > Bachelor 5 7%
Other 4 6%
Other 7 10%
Unknown 13 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 27 39%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 13 19%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 4 6%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 4%
Psychology 2 3%
Other 2 3%
Unknown 19 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 10. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 January 2020.
All research outputs
#2,396,387
of 17,902,988 outputs
Outputs from Ecological Applications
#648
of 2,897 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#56,089
of 283,481 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Ecological Applications
#22
of 44 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,902,988 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 86th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,897 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.3. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 283,481 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 44 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its contemporaries.