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Risk factors associated with Trypanosoma cruziexposure in domestic dogs from a rural community in Panama

Overview of attention for article published in Memórias do Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, November 2015
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Title
Risk factors associated with Trypanosoma cruziexposure in domestic dogs from a rural community in Panama
Published in
Memórias do Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, November 2015
DOI 10.1590/0074-02760150284
Pubmed ID
Authors

Azael Saldaña, José E Calzada, Vanessa Pineda, Milixa Perea, Chystrie Rigg, Kadir González, Ana Maria Santamaria, Nicole L Gottdenker, Luis F Chaves

Abstract

Chagas disease, caused by Trypanosoma cruziinfection, is a zoonosis of humans, wild and domestic mammals, including dogs. In Panama, the main T. cruzivector is Rhodnius pallescens, a triatomine bug whose main natural habitat is the royal palm, Attalea butyracea. In this paper, we present results from three T. cruziserological tests (immunochromatographic dipstick, indirect immunofluorescence and ELISA) performed in 51 dogs from 24 houses in Trinidad de Las Minas, western Panama. We found that nine dogs were seropositive (17.6% prevalence). Dogs were 1.6 times more likely to become T. cruziseropositive with each year of age and 11.6 times if royal palms where present in the peridomiciliary area of the dog's household or its two nearest neighbours. Mouse-baited-adhesive traps were employed to evaluate 12 peridomestic royal palms. All palms were found infested with R. pallescenswith an average of 25.50 triatomines captured per palm. Of 35 adult bugs analysed, 88.6% showed protozoa flagellates in their intestinal contents. In addition, dogs were five times more likely to be infected by the presence of an additional domestic animal species in the dog's peridomiciliary environment. Our results suggest that interventions focused on royal palms might reduce the exposure to T. cruzi infection.

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Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 91 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 91 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 18 20%
Student > Doctoral Student 10 11%
Student > Bachelor 10 11%
Researcher 10 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 11%
Other 12 13%
Unknown 21 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 22 24%
Medicine and Dentistry 11 12%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 9 10%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 8%
Immunology and Microbiology 6 7%
Other 11 12%
Unknown 25 27%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 August 2016.
All research outputs
#20,661,397
of 25,388,353 outputs
Outputs from Memórias do Instituto Oswaldo Cruz
#1,196
of 1,502 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#214,506
of 293,018 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Memórias do Instituto Oswaldo Cruz
#13
of 20 outputs
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