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Determinants of pre-procedural state anxiety and negative affect in first-time colposcopy patients: implications for intervention

Overview of attention for article published in European Journal of Cancer Care, November 2011
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1 tweeter

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Title
Determinants of pre-procedural state anxiety and negative affect in first-time colposcopy patients: implications for intervention
Published in
European Journal of Cancer Care, November 2011
DOI 10.1111/j.1365-2354.2011.01317.x
Pubmed ID
Authors

S. KOLA, J.C. WALSH

Abstract

Women experience significant emotional distress in relation to further diagnostic evaluation of pre-cancerous cell changes of the cervix. However, less is known about the specific variables that contribute to elevated state anxiety and negative affect prior to colposcopy. The study aims to identify psychosocial factors that predict distress in this patient group, which can help in the development of more sophisticated interventions to reduce psychological distress. Socio-demographic variables, scores for state anxiety, negative affect, trait anxiety, fear of pain, coping style, pain-related expectancy and knowledge were assessed in 164 first-time colposcopy patients immediately before the colposcopy examination. Twenty-six per cent of variance in pre-colposcopy state anxiety was significantly explained by marital status, parity, trait anxiety, fear of minor pain and expectations of discomfort. Twenty-nine per cent of variance in pre-colposcopy negative affect was significantly explained by trait anxiety and expectations of pain. Women who are single, have children, are high trait anxious, and anticipate pain and discomfort appear to be at risk for pre-colposcopy distress. Interventions aimed at reducing pre-colposcopy psychological distress should include situation-specific variables that are amenable to change, and trait anxious women are likely to benefit from interventions to reduce distress.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 38 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 3%
Unknown 37 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 18%
Student > Master 5 13%
Student > Postgraduate 4 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 11%
Student > Bachelor 3 8%
Other 10 26%
Unknown 5 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 12 32%
Medicine and Dentistry 10 26%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 11%
Arts and Humanities 2 5%
Environmental Science 1 3%
Other 2 5%
Unknown 7 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 December 2011.
All research outputs
#10,943,206
of 12,348,212 outputs
Outputs from European Journal of Cancer Care
#635
of 719 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#198,288
of 230,804 outputs
Outputs of similar age from European Journal of Cancer Care
#24
of 28 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,348,212 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 719 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.9. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 28 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.