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Assessing human-bat interactions around a protected area in northeastern Brazil

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine, November 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (55th percentile)

Mentioned by

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2 tweeters

Citations

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3 Dimensions

Readers on

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60 Mendeley
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Title
Assessing human-bat interactions around a protected area in northeastern Brazil
Published in
Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine, November 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13002-015-0058-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Karlla Morganna da Costa Rego, Caio Graco Zeppelini, Luiz Carlos Serramo Lopez, Rômulo Romeu Nóbrega Alves

Abstract

Bats are key components to the Neotropical forests. Unfortunately, their bad reputation is a major obstacle in their conservation as it creates fear and hostility towards them. Understanding this reputation acquired by bats and studying interactions between bats and humans has shown fundamental promise when creating strategies to forge a non-antagonistic coexistence between both parts and in the promotion of bat conservation in areas with ever-rising human occupation. Ninety people were surveyed from three villages that were situated around a Biological Reserve in the state of Paraiba; located in Northern Brazil. The survey was completed using semi-structured interviews addressing villager's knowledge of the biology and ecology of bats, their interactions with bats, potential medicinal uses, and their socioeconomic situation. Additionally, we sampled the bats that reside in or visit these villages. Bats were often considered harmful, dangerous and carriers of disease. Bats were often connected to hematophagia, as well. The respondents believe that impacts such as the deforestation are forcing bats into urban environments. With this research, we were able to register one of the few records of bats in popular medicine in Brazil. The folklore and superstition surrounding bats can form an obstacle that affects their conservation. Environmental education is an important step in order to create a harmonious coexistence between humans and bats and to mitigate the impending conflicts between humanity and nature.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 60 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 60 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 17 28%
Student > Master 12 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 10%
Researcher 5 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 7%
Other 11 18%
Unknown 5 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 24 40%
Environmental Science 10 17%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 8%
Social Sciences 4 7%
Psychology 2 3%
Other 7 12%
Unknown 8 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 31 December 2015.
All research outputs
#2,958,839
of 6,896,042 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine
#248
of 435 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#115,519
of 278,791 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine
#12
of 14 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,896,042 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 54th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 435 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.5. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 278,791 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 14 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 14th percentile – i.e., 14% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.