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Comparative study of the modulation of fructose/sucrose-induced hepatic steatosis by mixed lipid formulations varying in unsaturated fatty acid content

Overview of attention for article published in Nutrition & Metabolism, November 2015
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Title
Comparative study of the modulation of fructose/sucrose-induced hepatic steatosis by mixed lipid formulations varying in unsaturated fatty acid content
Published in
Nutrition & Metabolism, November 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12986-015-0038-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Rafat A. Siddiqui, Zhidong Xu, Kevin A. Harvey, Thomas M. Pavlina, Michael J. Becker, Gary P. Zaloga

Abstract

Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause of chronic liver disease in developed countries. NAFLD encompasses a spectrum of diseases, ranging from hepatic steatosis to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), cirrhosis, and liver failure. The etiology of NAFLD remains unclear but is thought to relate to increased fatty acid flux within the liver that results in toxic fatty acid metabolite production. One source of increased fatty acid flux is fructose/sucrose-induced hepatic lipogenesis. Current treatment for NAFLD encompasses dietary modifications. However, little scientific evidence exists on which to base many dietary recommendations, especially the intake of different types of carbohydrates and fats. We hypothesized that lipid mixtures of unsaturated fatty acids would inhibit lipogenesis and subsequent hepatic steatosis induced by high carbohydrate diets. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of different complex mixtures of fatty acids upon the development of fructose/sucrose-induced hepatic steatosis. C57BL/6 mice were randomized to normocaloric chow-based diets that varied in the type of carbohydrate (starch, sucrose, fructose). Animals in each carbohydrate group were further randomized to diets that varied in lipid type (no additional lipid, soybean oil, fish oil, olive/soybean oil, macadamia nut oil). These oils were chosen based upon their content of omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids, omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, omega-9 monounsaturated fatty acids, or omega-7 monounsaturated fatty acids. Fatty acid flux in the liver was determine by assessing hepatic lipid content (steatosis). We also assessed fatty acid levels in the plasma and liver of the animals, hepatic lipogenesis activity, hepatic stearoyl-CoA-1 desaturase activity, and hepatic elongase activity. Animals consumed similar amounts of the diets and maintained normal body weights throughout the study. Both sucrose and fructose induced hepatic lipogenesis and steatosis, with fructose being more potent. All mixed lipids similarly inhibited steatosis, limiting lipid content to levels found in the control (starch) animals. Lipogenesis and stearoyl-CoA-1 desaturase activity were increased in the sucrose and fructose groups. Levels of these enzymatic processes remained at baseline in all of the lipid groups. This is the first study to compare various complex lipid mixtures, based upon dietary oils with different types of long-chain fatty acids, upon development of sucrose/fructose-induced steatosis. Both carbohydrate source and lipid content appear important for the modulation of steatosis. Moderate intake of complex lipids with high unsaturated to saturated fatty acid ratios inhibited both lipogenesis and steatosis.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 41 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 41 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 8 20%
Student > Master 7 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 17%
Student > Postgraduate 4 10%
Researcher 3 7%
Other 7 17%
Unknown 5 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 12 29%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 9 22%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9 22%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 5%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 5%
Other 2 5%
Unknown 5 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 March 2016.
All research outputs
#3,592,684
of 7,406,294 outputs
Outputs from Nutrition & Metabolism
#360
of 501 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#132,986
of 284,957 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nutrition & Metabolism
#24
of 32 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,406,294 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 501 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 18.4. This one is in the 26th percentile – i.e., 26% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 284,957 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 32 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 21st percentile – i.e., 21% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.