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How Should Primary Care Physicians Respond to Direct-to-Consumer Genetic Test Results?

Overview of attention for article published in AMA Journal of Ethics, September 2018
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Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
44 tweeters

Citations

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3 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
20 Mendeley
Title
How Should Primary Care Physicians Respond to Direct-to-Consumer Genetic Test Results?
Published in
AMA Journal of Ethics, September 2018
DOI 10.1001/amajethics.2018.812
Pubmed ID
Abstract

In this case, a primary care physician is presented with direct-to-consumer genetic test results and asked to provide counseling and order follow-up diagnostics. In order to deal effectively with this situation, we suggest physicians need look no further than the practice principles that guide more routine clinical encounters. We examine the rationale behind 2 major clinical ethical considerations: (1) physicians have obligations to help their patients achieve reasonable health goals but are not obligated to perform procedures that are not medically indicated; and (2) primary care physicians do not need to know everything; they just need to know how to get their patients appropriate care.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 44 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 20 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 20 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 25%
Researcher 4 20%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 15%
Student > Master 2 10%
Student > Bachelor 2 10%
Other 3 15%
Unknown 1 5%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 4 20%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 20%
Business, Management and Accounting 3 15%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 10%
Arts and Humanities 1 5%
Other 3 15%
Unknown 3 15%