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Challenges to a molecular approach to prey identification in the Burmese python, Python molurus bivittatus

Overview of attention for article published in PeerJ, November 2015
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (60th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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2 tweeters
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5 Facebook pages

Citations

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3 Dimensions

Readers on

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27 Mendeley
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Title
Challenges to a molecular approach to prey identification in the Burmese python, Python molurus bivittatus
Published in
PeerJ, November 2015
DOI 10.7717/peerj.1445
Pubmed ID
Authors

Bryan G. Falk, Robert N. Reed, Falk, Bryan G, Reed, Robert N

Abstract

Molecular approaches to prey identification are increasingly useful in elucidating predator-prey relationships, and we aimed to investigate the feasibility of these methods to document the species identities of prey consumed by invasive Burmese pythons in Florida. We were particularly interested in the diet of young snakes, because visual identification of prey from this size class has proven difficult. We successfully extracted DNA from the gastrointestinal contents of 43 young pythons, as well as from several control samples, and attempted amplification of DNA mini-barcodes, a 130-bp region of COX1. Using a PNA clamp to exclude python DNA, we found that prey DNA was not present in sufficient quality for amplification of this locus in 86% of our samples. All samples from the GI tracts of young pythons contained only hair, and the six samples we were able to identify to species were hispid cotton rats. This suggests that young Burmese pythons prey predominantly on small mammals and that prey diversity among snakes of this size class is low. We discuss prolonged gastrointestinal transit times and extreme gastric breakdown as possible causes of DNA degradation that limit the success of a molecular approach to prey identification in Burmese pythons.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 27 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 4%
Unknown 26 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 8 30%
Researcher 6 22%
Student > Bachelor 3 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 11%
Unspecified 2 7%
Other 3 11%
Unknown 2 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 14 52%
Environmental Science 9 33%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 4%
Physics and Astronomy 1 4%
Unknown 2 7%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 December 2015.
All research outputs
#2,469,548
of 6,632,903 outputs
Outputs from PeerJ
#1,875
of 2,687 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#94,555
of 250,609 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PeerJ
#154
of 236 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,632,903 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 61st percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,687 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 20.3. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 250,609 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 236 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.