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Oxidative mitigation of aquatic methane emissions in large Amazonian rivers

Overview of attention for article published in Global Change Biology, February 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (57th percentile)

Mentioned by

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4 tweeters

Citations

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20 Dimensions

Readers on

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68 Mendeley
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Title
Oxidative mitigation of aquatic methane emissions in large Amazonian rivers
Published in
Global Change Biology, February 2016
DOI 10.1111/gcb.13169
Pubmed ID
Authors

Henrique O. Sawakuchi, David Bastviken, André O. Sawakuchi, Nicholas D. Ward, Clovis D. Borges, Siu M. Tsai, Jeffrey E. Richey, Maria Victoria R. Ballester, Alex V. Krusche

Abstract

The flux of methane (CH4 ) from inland waters to the atmosphere has a profound impact on global atmospheric greenhouse gas (GHG) levels, and yet, strikingly little is known about the dynamics controlling sources and sinks of CH4 in the aquatic setting. Here, we examine the cycling and flux of CH4 in six large rivers in the Amazon basin, including the Amazon River. Based on stable isotopic mass balances of CH4 , inputs and outputs to the water column were estimated. We determined that ecosystem methane oxidation (MOX) reduced the diffusive flux of CH4 by approximately 28-96% and varied depending on hydrologic regime and general geochemical characteristics of tributaries of the Amazon River. For example, the relative amount of MOX was maximal during high water in black and white water rivers and minimal in clear water rivers during low water. The abundance of genetic markers for methane-oxidizing bacteria (pmoA) was positively correlated with enhanced signals of oxidation, providing independent support for the detected MOX patterns. The results indicate that MOX in large Amazonian rivers can consume from 0.45 to 2.07 Tg CH4 yr(-1) , representing up to 7% of the estimated global soil sink. Nevertheless, climate change and changes in hydrology, for example, due to construction of dams, can alter this balance, influencing CH4 emissions to atmosphere.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 68 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Mexico 1 1%
Brazil 1 1%
United States 1 1%
Unknown 65 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 19%
Researcher 12 18%
Unspecified 10 15%
Student > Master 10 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 7%
Other 18 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 25 37%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 20 29%
Unspecified 13 19%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 6 9%
Social Sciences 2 3%
Other 2 3%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 February 2016.
All research outputs
#6,947,336
of 12,353,915 outputs
Outputs from Global Change Biology
#2,745
of 3,359 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#132,729
of 323,248 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Global Change Biology
#126
of 154 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,353,915 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,359 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 19.2. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 323,248 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 154 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.