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Latitudinal limits to the predicted increase of the peatland carbon sink with warming

Overview of attention for article published in Nature Climate Change, September 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (76th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
12 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
162 tweeters
facebook
3 Facebook pages
reddit
1 Redditor

Citations

dimensions_citation
50 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
175 Mendeley
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Title
Latitudinal limits to the predicted increase of the peatland carbon sink with warming
Published in
Nature Climate Change, September 2018
DOI 10.1038/s41558-018-0271-1
Authors

Angela V. Gallego-Sala, Dan J. Charman, Simon Brewer, Susan E. Page, I. Colin Prentice, Pierre Friedlingstein, Steve Moreton, Matthew J. Amesbury, David W. Beilman, Svante Björck, Tatiana Blyakharchuk, Christopher Bochicchio, Robert K. Booth, Joan Bunbury, Philip Camill, Donna Carless, Rodney A. Chimner, Michael Clifford, Elizabeth Cressey, Colin Courtney-Mustaphi, François De Vleeschouwer, Rixt de Jong, Barbara Fialkiewicz-Koziel, Sarah A. Finkelstein, Michelle Garneau, Esther Githumbi, John Hribjlan, James Holmquist, Paul D. M. Hughes, Chris Jones, Miriam C. Jones, Edgar Karofeld, Eric S. Klein, Ulla Kokfelt, Atte Korhola, Terri Lacourse, Gael Le Roux, Mariusz Lamentowicz, David Large, Martin Lavoie, Julie Loisel, Helen Mackay, Glen M. MacDonald, Markku Makila, Gabriel Magnan, Robert Marchant, Katarzyna Marcisz, Antonio Martínez Cortizas, Charly Massa, Paul Mathijssen, Dmitri Mauquoy, Timothy Mighall, Fraser J. G. Mitchell, Patrick Moss, Jonathan Nichols, Pirita O. Oksanen, Lisa Orme, Maara S. Packalen, Stephen Robinson, Thomas P. Roland, Nicole K. Sanderson, A. Britta K. Sannel, Noemí Silva-Sánchez, Natascha Steinberg, Graeme T. Swindles, T. Edward Turner, Joanna Uglow, Minna Väliranta, Simon van Bellen, Marjolein van der Linden, Bas van Geel, Guoping Wang, Zicheng Yu, Joana Zaragoza-Castells, Yan Zhao

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 162 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 175 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 175 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 37 21%
Student > Master 32 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 32 18%
Other 10 6%
Student > Bachelor 10 6%
Other 24 14%
Unknown 30 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 61 35%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 40 23%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 21 12%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 2%
Engineering 3 2%
Other 6 3%
Unknown 41 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 199. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 April 2019.
All research outputs
#96,622
of 16,258,151 outputs
Outputs from Nature Climate Change
#428
of 3,270 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#3,092
of 277,507 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature Climate Change
#20
of 84 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,258,151 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,270 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 99.3. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 277,507 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 84 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its contemporaries.