↓ Skip to main content

Allergy diagnosis from symptoms to molecules, or from molecules to symptoms: a comparative clinical study

Overview of attention for article published in World Allergy Organization Journal, January 2018
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (72nd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
12 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
9 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
28 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Allergy diagnosis from symptoms to molecules, or from molecules to symptoms: a comparative clinical study
Published in
World Allergy Organization Journal, January 2018
DOI 10.1186/s40413-018-0199-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

N. Mothes-Luksch, G. Jordakieva, L. Hinterhölzl, A.N. Jensen, P.K. Hallmann, M. Kundi, E. Jensen-Jarolim

Abstract

Classical allergy diagnostic workup "from symptoms to molecules" comprises 1) clinical investigation, 2) skin prick- and IgE- testing, and recently, 3) molecular allergy testing. We aimed to examine the diagnostic fidelity of the alternative approach "from molecules to symptoms", which was recently suggested in the EAACI Molecular Allergology User's Guide, in a retrospective clinical study. Records from 202 patients with clinically suspected allergic sensitizations were extracted from files at two sites applying either the "ISAC-first" workup with IgE-testing by immuno-solid phase allergen chip ISAC112 followed by selected skin prick tests (SPT) or the "SPT-first" starting with SPT followed by the microarray test. In the ISAC-first procedure significantly less SPTs were performed during allergy diagnosis (median 4 vs. 14). By SPT in 19% of patients in the ISAC-first group and in 34% in the SPT-first group additional respiratory allergens (p = 0.014) were detected not positive in ISAC microarray. By ISAC microarray test 18% additional sensitizations were found in the ISAC-first, and 32% in SPT-first cohort (p = 0.016). For food allergens 13 and 12% additional sensitizations were detected by the microarray not detected by SPT in the two groups (p = 0.800). No additional food allergen was found by SPT in the ISAC-first group, while in 6% of the cases in the SPT-first group detected sensitizations were negative in the microarray. The ISAC-first approach followed by (fewer) SPTs meets the demands for a patient's tailored diagnostic work-up and therefore can be considered equivalent to the conventional way using the skin prick test as first screening tool, followed by IgE diagnosis. For the diagnostic verification of clinically suspected allergy, the novel concept "from molecules to clinic" offers a reliable diagnostic workup in shorter time. Due to lower skin test numbers it is especially applicable for young children and seniors, in atopic patients, and whenever skin tests get difficult or unreliable.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 12 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 28 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 28 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 6 21%
Student > Bachelor 4 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 11%
Lecturer 3 11%
Student > Master 3 11%
Other 4 14%
Unknown 5 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Immunology and Microbiology 7 25%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 21%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 14%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 7%
Social Sciences 2 7%
Other 2 7%
Unknown 5 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 April 2019.
All research outputs
#2,761,420
of 14,693,496 outputs
Outputs from World Allergy Organization Journal
#167
of 564 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#74,267
of 271,245 outputs
Outputs of similar age from World Allergy Organization Journal
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,693,496 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 81st percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 564 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.5. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 271,245 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them