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Potential for advice from doctors to reduce the number of patients referred to emergency departments by NHS 111 call handlers: observational study

Overview of attention for article published in BMJ Open, January 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (94th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
blogs
1 blog
policy
1 policy source
twitter
80 tweeters
facebook
4 Facebook pages
googleplus
2 Google+ users

Citations

dimensions_citation
9 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
63 Mendeley
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Title
Potential for advice from doctors to reduce the number of patients referred to emergency departments by NHS 111 call handlers: observational study
Published in
BMJ Open, January 2015
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2015-009444
Pubmed ID
Authors

Andrew Anderson, Martin Roland, Anderson, Andrew, Roland, Martin

Abstract

To determine the effect of using experienced general practitioners (GPs) to review the advice given by call handlers in NHS 111, a national service giving telephone advice to people seeking medical care. Observational study following the introduction of GPs to review call handlers' decisions which had been made using decision support software. NHS 111 call centre covering Cambridgeshire and Peterborough. When a call handler using standard NHS 111 decision support software would have advised the caller to attend the hospital accident and emergency (A&E) department, the decision was reviewed by an experienced GP. Percentage of calls where an outcome other than A&E attendance was recommended by the GP. Of 1474 cases reviewed, the GP recommended A&E attendance in 400 cases (27.1%). In the remainder of cases, the GP recommended attendance at a primary care out-of-hours centre or minor injury unit in 665 cases (45.2%) and self-management or some alternative strategy in 409 (27.8%). Fewer callers to NHS 111 would be sent to emergency departments if the decision was reviewed by an experienced GP. Telephone triage services need to consider whether using relatively unskilled call handlers supported by computer software is the most cost-effective way to handle requests for medical care.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 80 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 63 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 3 5%
Unknown 60 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 14 22%
Researcher 11 17%
Unspecified 9 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 13%
Student > Bachelor 6 10%
Other 15 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 25 40%
Unspecified 14 22%
Nursing and Health Professions 10 16%
Social Sciences 4 6%
Business, Management and Accounting 2 3%
Other 8 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 77. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 December 2017.
All research outputs
#228,326
of 13,762,857 outputs
Outputs from BMJ Open
#475
of 12,387 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#7,763
of 358,600 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMJ Open
#26
of 434 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,762,857 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 12,387 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 18.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 358,600 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 434 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.