↓ Skip to main content

Exploring implementation and sustainability of models of care: can theory help?

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, January 2011
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (77th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (70th percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source
twitter
3 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
44 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
133 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Exploring implementation and sustainability of models of care: can theory help?
Published in
BMC Public Health, January 2011
DOI 10.1186/1471-2458-11-s5-s8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Della A Forster, Michelle Newton, Helen L McLachlan, Karen Willis

Abstract

Research on new models of care in health service provision is complex, as is the introduction and embedding of such models, and positive research findings are only one factor in whether a new model of care will be implemented. In order to understand why this is the case, research design must not only take account of proposed changes in the clinical encounter, but the organisational context that must sustain and normalise any changed practices. We use two case studies where new models of maternity care were implemented and evaluated via randomised controlled trials (RCTs) to discuss how (or whether) the use of theory might inform implementation and sustainability strategies. The Normalisation Process Model is proposed as a suitable theoretical framework, and a comparison made using the two case studies - one where a theoretical framework was used, the other where it was not. CONTEXT AND APPROACH: In the maternity sector there is considerable debate about which model of care provides the best outcomes for women, while being sustainable in the organisational setting. We explore why a model of maternity care--team midwifery (where women have a small group of midwives providing their care)-- that was implemented and tested in an RCT was not continued after the RCT's conclusion, despite showing the same or better outcomes for women in the intervention group compared with women allocated to usual care. We then discuss the conceptualisation and rationale leading to the use of the 'Normalisation Process Model' as an aid to exploring aspects of implementation of a caseload midwifery model (where women are allocated a primary midwife for their care) that has recently been evaluated by RCT.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 133 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 4 3%
Canada 2 2%
India 1 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
Indonesia 1 <1%
Switzerland 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
Unknown 122 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 26 20%
Student > Master 23 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 21 16%
Student > Bachelor 13 10%
Other 9 7%
Other 27 20%
Unknown 14 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 42 32%
Nursing and Health Professions 28 21%
Social Sciences 16 12%
Psychology 13 10%
Business, Management and Accounting 7 5%
Other 12 9%
Unknown 15 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 May 2016.
All research outputs
#4,040,715
of 15,621,522 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#4,293
of 10,758 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#48,696
of 216,338 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#194
of 663 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,621,522 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 74th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 10,758 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.9. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 59% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 216,338 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 663 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its contemporaries.