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Prevalence of Depression and Depressive Symptoms Among Resident Physicians

Overview of attention for article published in JAMA: Journal of the American Medical Association, December 2015
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  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

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738 Mendeley
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Title
Prevalence of Depression and Depressive Symptoms Among Resident Physicians
Published in
JAMA: Journal of the American Medical Association, December 2015
DOI 10.1001/jama.2015.15845
Pubmed ID
Authors

Douglas A. Mata, Marco A. Ramos, Narinder Bansal, Rida Khan, Constance Guille, Emanuele Di Angelantonio, Srijan Sen

Abstract

Physicians in training are at high risk for depression. However, the estimated prevalence of this disorder varies substantially between studies. To provide a summary estimate of depression or depressive symptom prevalence among resident physicians. Systematic search of EMBASE, ERIC, MEDLINE, and PsycINFO for studies with information on the prevalence of depression or depressive symptoms among resident physicians published between January 1963 and September 2015. Studies were eligible for inclusion if they were published in the peer-reviewed literature and used a validated method to assess for depression or depressive symptoms. Information on study characteristics and depression or depressive symptom prevalence was extracted independently by 2 trained investigators. Estimates were pooled using random-effects meta-analysis. Differences by study-level characteristics were estimated using meta-regression. Point or period prevalence of depression or depressive symptoms as assessed by structured interview or validated questionnaire. Data were extracted from 31 cross-sectional studies (9447 individuals) and 23 longitudinal studies (8113 individuals). Three studies used clinical interviews and 51 used self-report instruments. The overall pooled prevalence of depression or depressive symptoms was 28.8% (4969/17,560 individuals, 95% CI, 25.3%-32.5%), with high between-study heterogeneity (Q = 1247, τ2 = 0.39, I2 = 95.8%, P < .001). Prevalence estimates ranged from 20.9% for the 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire with a cutoff of 10 or more (741/3577 individuals, 95% CI, 17.5%-24.7%, Q = 14.4, τ2 = 0.04, I2 = 79.2%) to 43.2% for the 2-item PRIME-MD (1349/2891 individuals, 95% CI, 37.6%-49.0%, Q = 45.6, τ2 = 0.09, I2 = 84.6%). There was an increased prevalence with increasing calendar year (slope = 0.5% increase per year, adjusted for assessment modality; 95% CI, 0.03%-0.9%, P = .04). In a secondary analysis of 7 longitudinal studies, the median absolute increase in depressive symptoms with the onset of residency training was 15.8% (range, 0.3%-26.3%; relative risk, 4.5). No statistically significant differences were observed between cross-sectional vs longitudinal studies, studies of only interns vs only upper-level residents, or studies of nonsurgical vs both nonsurgical and surgical residents. In this systematic review, the summary estimate of the prevalence of depression or depressive symptoms among resident physicians was 28.8%, ranging from 20.9% to 43.2% depending on the instrument used, and increased with calendar year. Further research is needed to identify effective strategies for preventing and treating depression among physicians in training.

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Mendeley readers

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Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 4 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Ireland 1 <1%
Norway 1 <1%
Egypt 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Unknown 729 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 88 12%
Researcher 75 10%
Student > Postgraduate 74 10%
Student > Bachelor 72 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 57 8%
Other 181 25%
Unknown 191 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 321 43%
Psychology 51 7%
Nursing and Health Professions 29 4%
Social Sciences 20 3%
Neuroscience 16 2%
Other 86 12%
Unknown 215 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1942. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 September 2022.
All research outputs
#3,852
of 22,141,209 outputs
Outputs from JAMA: Journal of the American Medical Association
#133
of 32,345 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#32
of 406,118 outputs
Outputs of similar age from JAMA: Journal of the American Medical Association
#1
of 375 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,141,209 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 32,345 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 72.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 406,118 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 375 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.