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Genetic analyses of Astragalus sect. Humillimi (Fabaceae) resolve taxonomy and enable effective conservation

Overview of attention for article published in American Journal of Botany, September 2018
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Title
Genetic analyses of Astragalus sect. Humillimi (Fabaceae) resolve taxonomy and enable effective conservation
Published in
American Journal of Botany, September 2018
DOI 10.1002/ajb2.1157
Pubmed ID
Authors

Rob Massatti, Matthew T. Belus, Shahed Dowlatshahi, Gerard J. Allan

Abstract

Astragalus sect. Humillimi is distributed across the southwestern United States and contains two endangered taxa, A. cremnophylax var. cremnophylax and A. humillimus. The former was originally described from the South Rim of the Grand Canyon. Analysis of individuals discovered on the North Rim of the Grand Canyon yielded some evidence that the population represented a distinct species. To enable effective conservation, we clarify the group's taxonomy and characterize the genetic diversity of A. cremnophylax and A. humillimus. We used AFLPs to genotype most species in sect. Humillimi, focusing on the two endangered forms. We examined patterns of genetic diversity using complementary analytical approaches. Our results demonstrate that North Rim populations group with A. c. var. cremnophylax. We found low levels of genetic diversity at certain localities and strong differentiation among populations. Astragalus humillimus, which has suffered recent and severe population declines, exhibits weak differentiation among and low diversity within populations. Our results clarify the taxonomy of sect. Humillimi and define the boundaries of A. c. var. cremnophylax, which is shown to inhabit both rims of the Grand Canyon. This clarification, and detailed analysis of genetic variation within both endangered taxa, may advance ongoing efforts to conserve these taxa. Our results suggest that range-wide genetic analysis of A. humillimus may inform recovery strategies for this taxon.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 9 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 9 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 5 56%
Student > Bachelor 1 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 11%
Researcher 1 11%
Professor > Associate Professor 1 11%
Other 0 0%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 56%
Environmental Science 2 22%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 1 11%
Chemistry 1 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 September 2018.
All research outputs
#10,325,592
of 13,528,132 outputs
Outputs from American Journal of Botany
#2,604
of 2,923 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#185,270
of 265,871 outputs
Outputs of similar age from American Journal of Botany
#49
of 49 outputs
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