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Coffee and caffeine consumption and the risk of hypertension in postmenopausal women

Overview of attention for article published in American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, December 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (92nd percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (63rd percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
13 tweeters
facebook
3 Facebook pages

Citations

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26 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
57 Mendeley
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Title
Coffee and caffeine consumption and the risk of hypertension in postmenopausal women
Published in
American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, December 2015
DOI 10.3945/ajcn.115.120147
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jinnie J Rhee, FeiFei Qin, Haley K Hedlin, Tara I Chang, Chloe E Bird, Oleg Zaslavsky, JoAnn E Manson, Marcia L Stefanick, Wolfgang C Winkelmayer

Abstract

The associations of coffee and caffeine intakes with the risk of incident hypertension remain controversial. We sought to assess longitudinal relations of caffeinated coffee, decaffeinated coffee, and total caffeine intakes with mean blood pressure and incident hypertension in postmenopausal women in the Women's Health Initiative Observational Study. In a large prospective study, type and amount of coffee and total caffeine intakes were assessed by using self-reported questionnaires. Hypertension status was ascertained by using measured blood pressure and self-reported drug-treated hypertension. The mean intakes of caffeinated coffee, decaffeinated coffee, and caffeine were 2-3 cups/d, 1 cup/d, and 196 mg/d, respectively. Using multivariable linear regression, we examined the associations of baseline intakes of caffeinated coffee, decaffeinated coffee, and caffeine with measured systolic and diastolic blood pressures at annual visit 3 in 29,985 postmenopausal women who were not hypertensive at baseline. We used Cox proportional hazards models to estimate HRs and their 95% CIs for time to incident hypertension. During 112,935 person-years of follow-up, 5566 cases of incident hypertension were reported. Neither caffeinated coffee nor caffeine intake was associated with mean systolic or diastolic blood pressure, but decaffeinated coffee intake was associated with a small but clinically irrelevant decrease in mean diastolic blood pressure. Decaffeinated coffee intake was not associated with mean systolic blood pressure. Intakes of caffeinated coffee, decaffeinated coffee, and caffeine were not associated with the risk of incident hypertension (P-trend > 0.05 for all). In summary, these findings suggest that caffeinated coffee, decaffeinated coffee, and caffeine are not risk factors for hypertension in postmenopausal women.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 13 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 57 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Korea, Republic of 1 2%
Unknown 56 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 20 35%
Student > Postgraduate 10 18%
Unspecified 5 9%
Student > Master 5 9%
Professor > Associate Professor 3 5%
Other 14 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 22 39%
Nursing and Health Professions 12 21%
Unspecified 10 18%
Social Sciences 3 5%
Sports and Recreations 2 4%
Other 8 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 18. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 September 2016.
All research outputs
#875,256
of 13,457,546 outputs
Outputs from American Journal of Clinical Nutrition
#2,139
of 9,568 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#28,571
of 358,877 outputs
Outputs of similar age from American Journal of Clinical Nutrition
#40
of 111 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,457,546 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 9,568 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 25.4. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 358,877 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 111 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its contemporaries.