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Stress and its association with working efficiency of junior doctors during three postgraduate residency training programs

Overview of attention for article published in Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, December 2015
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (68th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (54th percentile)

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Citations

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29 Dimensions

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Title
Stress and its association with working efficiency of junior doctors during three postgraduate residency training programs
Published in
Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, December 2015
DOI 10.2147/ndt.s92408
Pubmed ID
Authors

Hamza Mohammad Abdulghani, Mohammed Meteb Al-harbi, Mohammad Irshad

Abstract

The residency training period in the medical profession is well known for physical and mental stress, which may affect cognitive function and practical life. The aims of this study were to assess prevalence of stress among the resident trainees of the three medical specialties of Saudi Commission for Health Specialties (SCHS) training programs, namely, Internal Medicine, Emergency Medicine, Family Medicine, and their association with training years, sex, and marital status. This study also aimed to correlate the stress levels with the working efficiency and self-perceived general health problems. Resident trainee physicians of SCHS were invited to complete a stress inventory Kessler 10, which is used for stress measurement. Pearson's chi-square test (χ (2)) and odds ratios (ORs) were used to quantify the associations between categorical variables. A P-value of <0.05 was considered statistically significant. A total of 318 (out of 389, with the response rate of 82%) resident trainees participated in this study. The mean (± standard deviation) age of the study population was 27.9 (±1.6) years. The results showed 70.4% of resident trainees had stressful conditions, which consisted of severe stress: 22.6%, moderate stress: 20.4%, and mild stress: 27.4%. During the 1st year (R-1), moderate stress (OR =5.87; 95% confidence interval =2.93-17.79; P=0.001) and severe stress (OR =11.15; 95% confidence interval =4.35-28.51; P=0.0001) levels were quite high. The highest stress level was found in Emergency Medicine (80.5%), followed by Internal Medicine (73.6%), and Family Medicine (63.2%) (χ (2)=6.42; P=0.04). The stress level decreased with the increase of years of training in Emergency Medicine (χ (2)=23.76; P<0.0001) and Internal Medicine (χ (2)=60.12; P<0.0001), whereas increased in Family Medicine (χ (2)=11.80; P=0.008). High stress level was significantly associated with absence from duty days (χ (2)=28.48, P<0.0001), inefficient day activities (χ (2)=39.15; P<0.0001), and general health problems (χ (2)=45.27; P<0.0001) of resident trainees. We found significantly high levels of stress among the resident trainees of SCHS. High levels of stress may have an effect on their working efficiency and general physical health. The high stress level decreased efficient day activity and made the trainees absent from the workplace.

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Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 87 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 1%
Brazil 1 1%
Unknown 85 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Postgraduate 13 15%
Student > Master 10 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 9 10%
Researcher 9 10%
Student > Bachelor 7 8%
Other 17 20%
Unknown 22 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 34 39%
Nursing and Health Professions 8 9%
Psychology 6 7%
Social Sciences 5 6%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 3 3%
Other 9 10%
Unknown 22 25%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 December 2015.
All research outputs
#8,261,756
of 25,373,627 outputs
Outputs from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#1,087
of 3,132 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#119,883
of 395,408 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#25
of 61 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 25,373,627 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 66th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,132 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.6. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 395,408 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 61 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 54% of its contemporaries.