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Prevalence of gastrointestinal symptoms in patients with influenza, clinical significance, and pathophysiology of human influenza viruses in faecal samples: what do we know?

Overview of attention for article published in Virology Journal, December 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (80th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (82nd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
8 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
reddit
1 Redditor

Citations

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30 Dimensions

Readers on

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50 Mendeley
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Title
Prevalence of gastrointestinal symptoms in patients with influenza, clinical significance, and pathophysiology of human influenza viruses in faecal samples: what do we know?
Published in
Virology Journal, December 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12985-015-0448-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Laetitia Minodier, Remi N. Charrel, Pierre-Emmanuel Ceccaldi, Sylvie van der Werf, Thierry Blanchon, Thomas Hanslik, Alessandra Falchi

Abstract

This review provides for the first time an assessment of the current understanding about the occurrence and the clinical significance of gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms in influenza patients, and their correlation with the presence of human influenza viruses in stools of patients with confirmed influenza virus infection. Studies exploring how human influenza viruses spread to the patient's GI tract after a primary respiratory infection have been summarized. We conducted a systematic search of published peer-reviewed literature up to June 2015 with regard to the above-mentioned aspects, focusing on human influenza viruses (A(H1N1), A(H1N1)pdm09, A(H3N2), and B). Forty-four studies were included in this systematic review and meta-analysis. The pooled prevalence of any digestive symptoms ranged from 30.9 % (95 % CI, 9.8 to 57.5; I (2) = 97.5 %) for A(H1N1)pdm09 to 2.8 % (95 % CI, 0.6 to 6.5; I (2) = 75.4 %) for A(H1N1). The pooled prevalence of influenza viruses in stool was 20.6 % (95 % CI, 8.9 to 35.5; I (2) = 96.8 %), but their correlation with GI symptoms has rarely been explored. The presence of viral RNA in stools because of haematogenous dissemination to organs via infected lymphocytes is likely, but the potential to cause direct intestinal infection and faecal-oral transmission warrants further investigation. This review highlights the gaps in our knowledge, and the high degree of uncertainty about the prevalence and significance of GI symptoms in patients with influenza and their correlation with viral RNA positivity in stool because of the high level of heterogeneity among studies.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 50 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 50 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 8 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 16%
Researcher 8 16%
Other 6 12%
Student > Master 5 10%
Other 12 24%
Unknown 3 6%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 23 46%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 10%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 4 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 8%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 4%
Other 8 16%
Unknown 4 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 May 2020.
All research outputs
#2,774,982
of 15,163,823 outputs
Outputs from Virology Journal
#250
of 2,358 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#72,284
of 365,176 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Virology Journal
#31
of 181 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,163,823 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 81st percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,358 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.5. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 365,176 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 181 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its contemporaries.