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Seniors managing multiple medications: using mixed methods to view the home care safety lens

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Health Services Research, December 2015
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (69th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
5 tweeters

Citations

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19 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
129 Mendeley
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Title
Seniors managing multiple medications: using mixed methods to view the home care safety lens
Published in
BMC Health Services Research, December 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12913-015-1193-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ariella Lang, Marilyn Macdonald, Patricia Marck, Lynn Toon, Melissa Griffin, Tony Easty, Kimberly Fraser, Neil MacKinnon, Jonathan Mitchell, Eddy Lang, Sharon Goodwin

Abstract

Patient safety is a national and international priority with medication safety earmarked as both a prevalent and high-risk area of concern. To date, medication safety research has focused overwhelmingly on institutional based care provided by paid healthcare professionals, which often has little applicability to the home care setting. This critical gap in our current understanding of medication safety in the home care sector is particularly evident with the elderly who often manage more than one chronic illness and a complex palette of medications, along with other care needs. This study addresses the medication management issues faced by seniors with chronic illnesses, their family, caregivers, and paid providers within Canadian publicly funded home care programs in Alberta (AB), Ontario (ON), Quebec (QC) and Nova Scotia (NS). Informed by a socio-ecological perspective, this study utilized Interpretive Description (ID) methodology and participatory photographic methods to capture and analyze a range of visual and textual data. Three successive phases of data collection and analysis were conducted in a concurrent, iterative fashion in eight urban and/or rural households in each province. A total of 94 participants (i.e., seniors receiving home care services, their family/caregivers, and paid providers) were interviewed individually. In addition, 69 providers took part in focus groups. Analysis was iterative and concurrent with data collection in that each interview was compared with subsequent interviews for converging as well as diverging patterns. Six patterns were identified that provide a rich portrayal of the complexity of medication management safety in home care: vulnerabilities that impact the safe management and storage of medication, sustaining adequate supports, degrees of shared accountability for care, systems of variable effectiveness, poly-literacy required to navigate the system, and systemic challenges to maintaining medication safety in the home. There is a need for policy makers, health system leaders, care providers, researchers, and educators to work with home care clients and caregivers on three key messages for improvement: adapt care delivery models to the home care landscape; develop a palette of user-centered tools to support medication safety in the home; and strengthen health systems integration.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 129 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Japan 1 <1%
Unknown 128 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 26 20%
Researcher 16 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 16 12%
Student > Bachelor 14 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 10 8%
Other 25 19%
Unknown 22 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 31 24%
Social Sciences 17 13%
Medicine and Dentistry 15 12%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 10 8%
Psychology 9 7%
Other 18 14%
Unknown 29 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 January 2016.
All research outputs
#4,934,138
of 15,791,305 outputs
Outputs from BMC Health Services Research
#2,523
of 5,436 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#112,358
of 369,106 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Health Services Research
#154
of 304 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,791,305 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 68th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,436 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.8. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 369,106 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 304 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.