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Phylogenetic relationships among Capuchin (Cebidae, Platyrrhini) lineages: An old event of sympatry explains the current distribution of Cebus and Sapajus

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Title
Phylogenetic relationships among Capuchin (Cebidae, Platyrrhini) lineages: An old event of sympatry explains the current distribution of Cebus and Sapajus
Published in
Genetics and Molecular Biology, September 2018
DOI 10.1590/1678-4685-gmb-2017-0012
Pubmed ID
Authors

Antonio Marcio Gomes Martins-Junior, Jeferson Carneiro, Iracilda Sampaio, Stephen F. Ferrari, Horacio Schneider

Abstract

Capuchin monkeys are currently represented by four species of Cebus and eight of Sapajus. This group is taxonomically complex and several questions still need to be clarified. In the current study, using mtDNA markers and a larger sample representation than in previous studies, we seek to understand the phylogenetic relationships among the capuchin lineages and their historical biogeography. All 12 species of capuchins were analyzed for the mitochondrial Control Region and Cytochrome b to test two biogeographical hypotheses: "Reinvasion of the Amazon (ROA)" and "Sympatric Evolution (SEV)". The phylogenetic relationships among distinct lineages within genera is consistent with an evolutionary diversification pattern probably resulting from an explosive process of diversification and dispersal between 2.0 Ma and 3.0 Ma. Also, the analyses show that the ancestral capuchins were distributed in a wide area encompassing the Amazon and Atlantic Forest. Our results support the SEV hypothesis, showing that the current syntopic distribution of Cebus and Sapajus can be explained by a sympatric speciation event in the Amazon. We also indicate that the recently proposed species taxonomy of Cebus is not supported, and that S. cay and S. macrocephalus are a junior synonym of S. apella.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 34 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 34 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 7 21%
Student > Bachelor 6 18%
Researcher 4 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 6%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 6%
Other 2 6%
Unknown 11 32%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 14 41%
Environmental Science 2 6%
Social Sciences 2 6%
Neuroscience 1 3%
Unknown 15 44%