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Boosting Belligerence

Overview of attention for article published in Psychological Science (Sage Publications Inc.), December 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (83rd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
12 news outlets
blogs
4 blogs
twitter
54 tweeters
peer_reviews
1 peer review site

Citations

dimensions_citation
41 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
96 Mendeley
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Title
Boosting Belligerence
Published in
Psychological Science (Sage Publications Inc.), December 2015
DOI 10.1177/0956797615615584
Pubmed ID
Authors

Julie Van de Vyver, Diane M. Houston, Dominic Abrams, Milica Vasiljevic

Abstract

Major terrorist events, such as the recent attacks in Ankara, Sinai, and Paris, can have profound effects on a nation's values, attitudes, and prejudices. Yet psychological evidence testing the impact of such events via data collected immediately before and after an attack is understandably rare. In the present research, we tested the independent and joint effects of threat (the July 7, 2005, London bombings) and political ideology on endorsement of moral foundations and prejudices among two nationally representative samples (combined N = 2,031) about 6 weeks before and 1 month after the London bombings. After the bombings, there was greater endorsement of the in-group foundation, lower endorsement of the fairness-reciprocity foundation, and stronger prejudices toward Muslims and immigrants. The differences in both the endorsement of the foundations and the prejudices were larger among people with a liberal orientation than among those with a conservative orientation. Furthermore, the changes in endorsement of moral foundations among liberals explained their increases in prejudice. The results highlight the value of psychological theory and research for understanding societal changes in attitudes and prejudices after major terrorist events.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 54 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 96 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 2%
Netherlands 2 2%
Portugal 1 1%
United Kingdom 1 1%
Hungary 1 1%
Italy 1 1%
Singapore 1 1%
Unknown 87 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 23 24%
Student > Master 19 20%
Student > Bachelor 12 13%
Researcher 10 10%
Professor 9 9%
Other 23 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 53 55%
Social Sciences 13 14%
Unspecified 11 11%
Business, Management and Accounting 5 5%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 4 4%
Other 10 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 159. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 April 2018.
All research outputs
#88,981
of 13,484,970 outputs
Outputs from Psychological Science (Sage Publications Inc.)
#367
of 3,579 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#3,078
of 359,888 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Psychological Science (Sage Publications Inc.)
#8
of 49 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,484,970 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,579 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 64.3. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 359,888 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 49 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its contemporaries.