↓ Skip to main content

Daily transcriptome changes reveal the role of nitrogen in controlling microcystin synthesis and nutrient transport in the toxic cyanobacterium, Microcystis aeruginosa

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Genomics, December 2015
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (59th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
3 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
30 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
73 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Daily transcriptome changes reveal the role of nitrogen in controlling microcystin synthesis and nutrient transport in the toxic cyanobacterium, Microcystis aeruginosa
Published in
BMC Genomics, December 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12864-015-2275-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Matthew J. Harke, Christopher J. Gobler

Abstract

While transcriptomics have become a valuable tool for linking physiology and ecology in aquatic microbes, the temporal dynamics of global transcriptomic patterns in Microcystis have rarely been assessed. Furthermore, while many microbial studies have explored expression of nutrient transporter genes, few studies have concurrently measured nutrient assimilation rates. Here, we considered how the global transcriptomic patterns and physiology of the cyanobacterium, Microcystis aeruginosa, changed daily as cells were grown from replete to deficient nitrogen (N) conditions and then back to replete conditions. During N deprivation, Microcystis downregulated genes involved in photosynthesis and respiration, carbon acquisition, lipid metabolism, and amino acid biosynthesis while upregulating genes involved in N acquisition and transport. With increasing N stress, both the strength of expression and number of genes being differentially expressed increased, until N was restored at which point these patterns reversed. Uptake of (15)N-labeled nitrate, ammonium and urea reflected differential expression of genes encoding transporters for these nutrients, with Microcystis appearing to preferentially increase transcription of ammonium and urea transporters and uptake of these compounds during N deprivation. Nitrate uptake and nitrate transporter expression were correlated for one set of transporters but not another, indicating these were high and low affinity nitrate transporters, respectively. Concentrations of microcystin per cell decreased during N deprivation and increased upon N restoration. However, the transcript abundance of genes involved in the synthesis of this compound was complex, as microcystin synthetase genes involved in peptide synthesis were downregulated under N deprivation while genes involved in tailoring and transport were upregulated, suggesting modification of the microcystin molecule under N stress as well as potential alternative functions for these genes and/or this toxin. Collectively, this study highlights the complex choreography of gene expression, cell physiology, and toxin synthesis that dynamic N levels can elicit in this ecologically important cyanobacterium. Differing expression patterns of genes within the microcystin synthetase operon in response to changing N levels revealed the potential limitations drawing conclusions based on only one gene in this operon.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 73 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 1%
Unknown 72 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 21 29%
Researcher 19 26%
Student > Master 10 14%
Student > Bachelor 6 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 5%
Other 7 10%
Unknown 6 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 24 33%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 21 29%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 8 11%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 4 5%
Engineering 3 4%
Other 2 3%
Unknown 11 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 December 2015.
All research outputs
#2,769,712
of 6,790,336 outputs
Outputs from BMC Genomics
#2,590
of 5,238 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#112,766
of 288,038 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Genomics
#201
of 345 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,790,336 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 58th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,238 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.0. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 288,038 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 59% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 345 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.