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Site fragmentation, hominin mobility and LCT variability reflected in the early Acheulean record of the Okote Member, at Koobi Fora, Kenya

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Human Evolution, December 2018
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (85th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (54th percentile)

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17 tweeters
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2 Facebook pages
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1 Wikipedia page

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12 Mendeley
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Title
Site fragmentation, hominin mobility and LCT variability reflected in the early Acheulean record of the Okote Member, at Koobi Fora, Kenya
Published in
Journal of Human Evolution, December 2018
DOI 10.1016/j.jhevol.2018.07.008
Pubmed ID
Authors

Darya Presnyakova, David R. Braun, Nicholas J. Conard, Craig Feibel, John W.K. Harris, Cornel M. Pop, Stefan Schlager, Will Archer

Abstract

From its initial appearance at ∼1.7 Ma, the Acheulean was prevalent through a vast chronological span of hominin behavioural evolution that lasted nearly 1.5 million years. The origins and production patterns of large bifacial cutting tools ('LCTs') - the marker of the Acheulean techno-complex - and the systematic changes in this behaviour through time are gaining increasing interest in paleoanthropology. Here we provide a synthesis of early Acheulean LCT variation in a landscape context by analysing assemblages from four different quasi-contemporaneous (∼1.4 Ma) sites from the Koobi Fora Formation. We characterize this variation using both 3D geometric morphometric and descriptive approaches. The expansive lateral exposures of fluvial and lacustrine sediments, as well as the associated tephrostratigraphy of the Koobi Fora Formation provide the landscape context that enables these comparative analyses. Our study demonstrates that when multiple contemporaneous early Acheulean localities are analysed together, a broader picture of LCT variability is elucidated. Four sites at Koobi Fora appear to represent a single system of lithic economy, characterized by a discrete trajectory of changes in LCT size and shape. These sites have ranges of LCT forms which appear to represent different but overlapping stages on a single reduction trajectory. Certain sites exhibit the full reduction trajectory while others exhibit only fragments of this trajectory. Other inter-site lithic proxies further complement these patterns in LCT variability. We explore patterns of site function, mobility and hominin landscape use, all of which may be suggestive of a depth of planning in early Acheulean hominins wherein technological activities were undertaken in substantial anticipation of future needs.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 17 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 12 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 12 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 42%
Researcher 4 33%
Professor 1 8%
Student > Master 1 8%
Unspecified 1 8%
Other 0 0%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Arts and Humanities 7 58%
Social Sciences 4 33%
Unspecified 1 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 13. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 October 2018.
All research outputs
#994,634
of 12,268,053 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Human Evolution
#384
of 1,461 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#36,373
of 249,582 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Human Evolution
#15
of 33 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,268,053 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 91st percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,461 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 17.6. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 249,582 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 33 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 54% of its contemporaries.