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Avian Influenza Ecology in North Atlantic Sea Ducks: Not All Ducks Are Created Equal

Overview of attention for article published in PLoS ONE, December 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (77th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (74th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
10 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
7 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
20 Mendeley
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Title
Avian Influenza Ecology in North Atlantic Sea Ducks: Not All Ducks Are Created Equal
Published in
PLoS ONE, December 2015
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0144524
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jeffrey S. Hall, Robin E. Russell, J. Christian Franson, Catherine Soos, Robert J. Dusek, R. Bradford Allen, Sean W. Nashold, Joshua L. TeSlaa, Jón Eínar Jónsson, Jennifer R. Ballard, Naomi Jane Harms, Justin D. Brown

Abstract

Wild waterfowl are primary reservoirs of avian influenza viruses (AIV). However the role of sea ducks in the ecology of avian influenza, and how that role differs from freshwater ducks, has not been examined. We obtained and analyzed sera from North Atlantic sea ducks and determined the seroprevalence in those populations. We also tested swab samples from North Atlantic sea ducks for the presence of AIV. We found relatively high serological prevalence (61%) in these sea duck populations but low virus prevalence (0.3%). Using these data we estimated that an antibody half-life of 141 weeks (3.2 years) would be required to attain these prevalences. These findings are much different than what is known in freshwater waterfowl and have implications for surveillance efforts, AIV in marine environments, and the roles of sea ducks and other long-lived waterfowl in avian influenza ecology.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 10 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 20 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 10%
Canada 1 5%
Unknown 17 85%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 5 25%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 20%
Student > Master 3 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 15%
Student > Postgraduate 3 15%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 2 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 11 55%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 3 15%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 5%
Environmental Science 1 5%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 5%
Other 1 5%
Unknown 2 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 July 2016.
All research outputs
#3,515,437
of 14,963,954 outputs
Outputs from PLoS ONE
#41,429
of 152,593 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#80,161
of 363,975 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLoS ONE
#1,235
of 4,871 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,963,954 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 76th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 152,593 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.7. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 363,975 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 4,871 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its contemporaries.