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Physical activity, hormone replacement therapy and breast cancer risk: A meta-analysis of prospective studies

Overview of attention for article published in European Journal of Cancer (1965), January 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (74th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (67th percentile)

Mentioned by

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7 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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43 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
122 Mendeley
Title
Physical activity, hormone replacement therapy and breast cancer risk: A meta-analysis of prospective studies
Published in
European Journal of Cancer (1965), January 2016
DOI 10.1016/j.ejca.2015.10.063
Pubmed ID
Authors

Cécile Pizot, Mathieu Boniol, Patrick Mullie, Alice Koechlin, Magali Boniol, Peter Boyle, Philippe Autier

Abstract

Lower risk of breast cancer has been reported among physically active women, but the risk in women using hormone replacement therapy (HRT) appears to be higher. We quantified the association between physical activity and breast cancer, and we examined the influence that HRT use and other risk factors had on this association. After a systematic literature search, prospective studies were meta-analysed using random-effect models applied on highest versus lowest level of physical activity. Dose-response analyses were conducted with studies reporting physical activity either in hours per week or in hours of metabolic equivalent per week (MET-h/week). The literature search identified 38 independent prospective studies published between 1987 and 2014 that included 116,304 breast cancer cases. Compared to the lowest level of physical activity, the highest level was associated with a summary relative risk (SRR) of 0.88 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.85, 0.90) for all breast cancer, 0.89 (95% CI 0.83, 0.95) for ER+/PR+ breast cancer and 0.80 (95% CI 0.69, 0.92) for ER-/PR- breast cancer. Risk reductions were not influenced by the type of physical activity (occupational or non-occupational), adiposity, and menopausal status. Risk reductions increased with increasing amounts of physical activity without threshold effect. In six studies, the SRR was 0.78 (95% CI 0.70, 0.87) in women who never used HRT and 0.97 (95% CI 0.88, 1.07) in women who ever used HRT, without heterogeneity in results. Findings indicate that a physically inactive women engaging in at least 150 min per week of vigorous physical activity would reduce their lifetime risk of breast cancer by 9%, a reduction that might be two times greater in women who never used HRT. Increasing physical activity is associated with meaningful reductions in the risk of breast cancer, but in women who ever used HRT, the preventative effect of physical activity seems to be cancelled out.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 122 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Mexico 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 118 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 22 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 20 16%
Student > Master 19 16%
Researcher 17 14%
Student > Bachelor 12 10%
Other 32 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 39 32%
Unspecified 26 21%
Nursing and Health Professions 15 12%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 12 10%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 9 7%
Other 21 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 February 2019.
All research outputs
#3,447,942
of 13,381,736 outputs
Outputs from European Journal of Cancer (1965)
#1,107
of 4,015 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#89,395
of 358,664 outputs
Outputs of similar age from European Journal of Cancer (1965)
#19
of 58 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,381,736 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 74th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,015 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.9. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 358,664 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 58 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 67% of its contemporaries.