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Interventions for psychotic symptoms concomitant with epilepsy

Overview of attention for article published in Cochrane database of systematic reviews, December 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (66th percentile)

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3 tweeters
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2 Facebook pages

Citations

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3 Dimensions

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118 Mendeley
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Title
Interventions for psychotic symptoms concomitant with epilepsy
Published in
Cochrane database of systematic reviews, December 2015
DOI 10.1002/14651858.cd006118.pub3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Saeed Farooq, Akhtar Sherin

Abstract

This is an updated version of the original Cochrane review published in Issue 4, 2008.People suffering from epilepsy have an increased risk of experiencing psychotic symptoms. The psychotic syndromes associated with epilepsy have generally been classified as ictal, postictal, and interictal psychosis. Anticonvulsant drugs have been reported to precipitate psychosis. Moreover, all antipsychotic drugs have the propensity to cause paroxysmal electroencephalogram abnormalities and induce seizures. To evaluate the benefits of interventions used to treat clinically significant psychotic symptoms occurring in people with epilepsy with regard to global improvement, changes in mental state, hospitalization, behavior, quality of life, effect on the frequency of seizures, and interaction with antiepileptic drugs. We searched the Cochrane Epilepsy Group's Specialized Register (23 March 2015), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL via the Cochrane Register of Studies Online (CRSO), 23 March 2015), MEDLINE (Ovid, 1946 to 23 March 2015), PsycINFO (1887 to 23 March 2015), CINAHL (1937 to 23 March 2015), and BIOSIS Previews (1969 to 23 March 2015).Two review authors (SF and AS) independently inspected the citations identified from the search. We identified potentially relevant abstracts and assessed full papers for inclusion and methodological quality. All randomized controlled trials comparing drugs, behavior therapy, cognitive behavior therapy, or other non-pharmacological interventions used to relieve psychotic symptoms in people with epilepsy. We planned to extract and analyze the data from all relevant studies using standardized methods. As only one study met the inclusion criteria, we attempted no meta-analysis. After independently assessing the abstracts and titles of 618 articles, we selected five relevant abstracts. Ultimately we found only one study meeting the inclusion criteria, which was available only as an abstract. This study compared the use of olanzapine (10 mg/day) with haloperidol (12 mg/day) in 16 people suffering from schizophrenia-like psychosis of epilepsy. Thirteen participants completed the study. Significant improvement was associated with use of olanzapine. We did not identify any study on psychosocial interventions in people suffering from epilepsy and psychosis. We found only one randomized controlled trial, which lacked the power to test the efficacy of antipsychotics in those suffering from psychosis concomitant with epilepsy.Limited evidence from this small randomized controlled trial suggests an improvement in psychotic symptoms, but not other outcome measures, with the use of an antipsychotic. The effects on seizure control are not well studied. Further trials are required to inform practice.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 118 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
India 1 <1%
Colombia 1 <1%
Unknown 116 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 29 25%
Student > Postgraduate 15 13%
Student > Bachelor 15 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 10%
Researcher 11 9%
Other 36 31%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 54 46%
Psychology 25 21%
Unspecified 14 12%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 7 6%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 5%
Other 12 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 March 2019.
All research outputs
#6,834,040
of 13,549,568 outputs
Outputs from Cochrane database of systematic reviews
#7,713
of 10,646 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#119,433
of 360,683 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cochrane database of systematic reviews
#154
of 203 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,549,568 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 10,646 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 21.1. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 360,683 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 203 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.