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Knowledge, perception and practices about malaria, climate change, livelihoods and food security among rural communities of central Tanzania

Overview of attention for article published in Infectious Diseases of Poverty, April 2015
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1 tweeter

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103 Mendeley
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Title
Knowledge, perception and practices about malaria, climate change, livelihoods and food security among rural communities of central Tanzania
Published in
Infectious Diseases of Poverty, April 2015
DOI 10.1186/s40249-015-0052-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Benjamin K Mayala, Carolyn A Fahey, Dorothy Wei, Maria M Zinga, Veneranda M Bwana, Tabitha Mlacha, Susan F Rumisha, Grades Stanley, Elizabeth H Shayo, Leonard EG Mboera

Abstract

Understanding the interactions between malaria and agriculture in Tanzania is of particular significance when considering that they are the major sources of illness and livelihoods. The objective of this study was to determine knowledge, perceptions and practices as regards to malaria, climate change, livelihoods and food insecurity in a rural farming community in central Tanzania. Using a cross-sectional design, heads of households were interviewed on their knowledge and perceptions on malaria transmission, symptoms and prevention and knowledge and practices as regards to climate change and food security. A total of 399 individuals (mean age = 39.8 ± 15.5 years) were interviewed. Most (62.41%) of them had attained primary school education and majority (91.23%) were involved in crop farming activities. Nearly all (94.7%) knew that malaria is acquired through a mosquito bite. Three quarters (73%) reported that most people get sick from malaria during the rainy season. About 50% of the respondents felt that malaria had decreased during the last 10 years. The household coverage of insecticide treated mosquito nets (ITN) was high (95.5%). Ninety-six percent reported to have slept under a mosquito net the previous night. Only one in four understood the official Kiswahili term (Mabadiliko ya Tabia Nchi) for climate change. However, there was a general understanding that the rain patterns have changed in the past 10 years. Sixty-two percent believed that the temperature has increased during the same period. Three quarters of the respondents reported that they had no sufficient production from their own farms to guarantee food security in their household for the year. Three quarters (73.0%) reported to having food shortages in the past five years. About half said they most often experienced severe food shortage during the rainy season. Farming communities in Kilosa District have little knowledge on climate change and its impact on malaria burden. Food insecurity is common and community-based strategies to mitigate this need to be established. The findings call for an integrated control of malaria and food insecurity interventions.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 103 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Ethiopia 1 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 97 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 22 21%
Researcher 20 19%
Student > Bachelor 15 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 14 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 6%
Other 18 17%
Unknown 8 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 26 25%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 16 16%
Social Sciences 15 15%
Environmental Science 15 15%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 7%
Other 14 14%
Unknown 10 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 December 2015.
All research outputs
#10,214,011
of 12,786,839 outputs
Outputs from Infectious Diseases of Poverty
#335
of 443 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#241,743
of 354,667 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Infectious Diseases of Poverty
#28
of 40 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,786,839 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 443 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.0. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 354,667 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 40 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.