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The cellular growth rate controls overall mRNA turnover, and modulates either transcription or degradation rates of particular gene regulons

Overview of attention for article published in Nucleic Acids Research, December 2015
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (76th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (53rd percentile)

Mentioned by

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8 tweeters

Citations

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25 Dimensions

Readers on

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88 Mendeley
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Title
The cellular growth rate controls overall mRNA turnover, and modulates either transcription or degradation rates of particular gene regulons
Published in
Nucleic Acids Research, December 2015
DOI 10.1093/nar/gkv1512
Pubmed ID
Authors

José García-Martínez, Lidia Delgado-Ramos, Guillermo Ayala, Vicent Pelechano, Daniel A. Medina, Fany Carrasco, Ramón González, Eduardo Andrés-León, Lars Steinmetz, Jonas Warringer, Sebastián Chávez, José E. Pérez-Ortín

Abstract

We analyzed 80 different genomic experiments, and found a positive correlation between both RNA polymerase II transcription and mRNA degradation with growth rates in yeast. Thus, in spite of the marked variation in mRNA turnover, the total mRNA concentration remained approximately constant. Some genes, however, regulated their mRNA concentration by uncoupling mRNA stability from the transcription rate. Ribosome-related genes modulated their transcription rates to increase mRNA levels under fast growth. In contrast, mitochondria-related and stress-induced genes lowered mRNA levels by reducing mRNA stability or the transcription rate, respectively. We also detected these regulations within the heterogeneity of a wild-type cell population growing in optimal conditions. The transcriptomic analysis of sorted microcolonies confirmed that the growth rate dictates alternative expression programs by modulating transcription and mRNA decay.The regulation of overall mRNA turnover keeps a constant ratio between mRNA decay and the dilution of [mRNA] caused by cellular growth. This regulation minimizes the indiscriminate transmission of mRNAs from mother to daughter cells, and favors the response capacity of the latter to physiological signals and environmental changes. We also conclude that, by uncoupling mRNA synthesis from decay, cells control the mRNA abundance of those gene regulons that characterize fast and slow growth.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 88 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 1%
Switzerland 1 1%
United Kingdom 1 1%
China 1 1%
United States 1 1%
Belgium 1 1%
Unknown 82 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 32 36%
Researcher 13 15%
Unspecified 9 10%
Student > Bachelor 9 10%
Student > Master 8 9%
Other 17 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 37 42%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 26 30%
Unspecified 11 13%
Engineering 4 5%
Computer Science 2 2%
Other 8 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 May 2016.
All research outputs
#3,416,788
of 13,664,802 outputs
Outputs from Nucleic Acids Research
#7,249
of 21,430 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#86,022
of 362,260 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nucleic Acids Research
#163
of 353 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,664,802 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 74th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 21,430 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 362,260 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 353 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its contemporaries.