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An Immune-Inflammation Gene Expression Signature in Prostate Tumors of Smokers

Overview of attention for article published in Cancer Research, December 2015
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (64th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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6 tweeters

Citations

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22 Dimensions

Readers on

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47 Mendeley
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Title
An Immune-Inflammation Gene Expression Signature in Prostate Tumors of Smokers
Published in
Cancer Research, December 2015
DOI 10.1158/0008-5472.can-14-3630
Pubmed ID
Authors

Robyn L. Prueitt, Tiffany A. Wallace, Sharon A. Glynn, Ming Yi, Wei Tang, Jun Luo, Tiffany H. Dorsey, Katherine E. Stagliano, John W. Gillespie, Robert S. Hudson, Atsushi Terunuma, Jennifer L. Shoe, Diana C. Haines, Harris G. Yfantis, Misop Han, Damali N. Martin, Symone V. Jordan, James F. Borin, Michael J. Naslund, Richard B. Alexander, Robert M. Stephens, Christopher A. Loffredo, Dong H. Lee, Nagireddy Putluri, Arun Sreekumar, Arthur A. Hurwitz, Stefan Ambs

Abstract

Smokers develop metastatic prostate cancer more frequently than nonsmokers, suggesting that a tobacco-derived factor is driving metastatic progression. To identify smoking-induced alterations in human prostate cancer, we analyzed gene and protein expression patterns in tumors collected from current, past, and never smokers. By this route, we elucidated a distinct pattern of molecular alterations characterized by an immune and inflammation signature in tumors from current smokers that were either attenuated or absent in past and never smokers. Specifically, this signature included elevated immunoglobulin expression by tumor-infiltrating B cells, NF-κB activation, and increased chemokine expression. In an alternate approach to characterize smoking-induced oncogenic alterations, we also explored the effects of nicotine in human prostate cancer cells and prostate cancer-prone TRAMP mice. These investigations showed that nicotine increased glutamine consumption and invasiveness of cancer cells in vitro and accelerated metastatic progression in tumor-bearing TRAMP mice. Overall, our findings suggested that nicotine was sufficient to induce a phenotype resembling the epidemiology of smoking-associated prostate cancer progression, illuminating a novel candidate driver underlying metastatic prostate cancer in current smokers.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 47 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 2 4%
United States 1 2%
United Kingdom 1 2%
Unknown 43 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 14 30%
Student > Bachelor 6 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 11%
Student > Master 4 9%
Professor 4 9%
Other 9 19%
Unknown 5 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 13 28%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 11 23%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 13%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 4%
Computer Science 2 4%
Other 4 9%
Unknown 9 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 July 2016.
All research outputs
#5,263,667
of 16,504,839 outputs
Outputs from Cancer Research
#5,708
of 14,807 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#116,228
of 374,051 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cancer Research
#89
of 200 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,504,839 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 14,807 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.9. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 374,051 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 200 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.