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Molecular composition of organic aerosols at urban background and road tunnel sites using ultra-high resolution mass spectrometry

Overview of attention for article published in Faraday Discussions of the Chemical Society, January 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (53rd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (72nd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
4 tweeters

Citations

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26 Dimensions

Readers on

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32 Mendeley
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Title
Molecular composition of organic aerosols at urban background and road tunnel sites using ultra-high resolution mass spectrometry
Published in
Faraday Discussions of the Chemical Society, January 2016
DOI 10.1039/c5fd00206k
Pubmed ID
Authors

Haijie Tong, Ivan Kourtchev, Pallavi Pant, Ian J. Keyte, Ian P. O'Connor, John C. Wenger, Francis D. Pope, Roy M. Harrison, Markus Kalberer

Abstract

Organic aerosol composition in the urban atmosphere is highly complex and strongly influenced by vehicular emissions which vary according to the make-up of the vehicle fleet. Normalized test measurements do not necessarily reflect real-world emission profiles and road tunnels are therefore ideal locations to characterise realistic traffic particle emissions with minimal interference from other particle sources and from atmospheric aging processes affecting their composition. In the current study, the composition of fine particles (diameter ≤2.5 μm) at an urban background site (Elms Road Observatory Site) and a road tunnel (Queensway) in Birmingham, UK, were analysed with direct infusion, nano-electrospray ionisation ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry (UHRMS). The overall particle composition at these two sites is compared with an industrial harbour site in Cork, Ireland, with special emphasis on oxidised mono-aromatics, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and nitro-aromatics. Different classification criteria, such as double bond equivalents, aromaticity index and aromaticity equivalent are used and compared to assess the fraction of aromatic components in the approximately one thousand oxidized organic compounds at the different sampling locations.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 32 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 3%
Unknown 31 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 9 28%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 22%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 9%
Other 2 6%
Professor 2 6%
Other 6 19%
Unknown 3 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Chemistry 12 38%
Environmental Science 5 16%
Engineering 2 6%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 3%
Physics and Astronomy 1 3%
Other 3 9%
Unknown 8 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 March 2020.
All research outputs
#10,157,074
of 17,360,236 outputs
Outputs from Faraday Discussions of the Chemical Society
#554
of 1,167 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#169,220
of 375,107 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Faraday Discussions of the Chemical Society
#26
of 99 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,360,236 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,167 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.0. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 375,107 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 99 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its contemporaries.