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Hungry for an intervention? Adolescents’ ratings of acceptability of eating-related intervention strategies

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, January 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (74th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (65th percentile)

Mentioned by

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8 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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29 Dimensions

Readers on

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149 Mendeley
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Title
Hungry for an intervention? Adolescents’ ratings of acceptability of eating-related intervention strategies
Published in
BMC Public Health, January 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12889-015-2665-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

F. Marijn Stok, Denise T. D. de Ridder, Emely de Vet, Liliya Nureeva, Aleksandra Luszczynska, Jane Wardle, Tania Gaspar, John B. F. de Wit

Abstract

Effective interventions promoting healthier eating behavior among adolescents are urgently needed. One factor that has been shown to impact effectiveness is whether the target population accepts the intervention. While previous research has assessed adults' acceptance of eating-related interventions, research on the opinion of adolescents is lacking. The current study addressed this gap in the literature. Two thousand seven hundred sixty four adolescents (aged 10-17 years) from four European countries answered questions about individual characteristics (socio-demographics, anthropometrics, and average daily intake of healthy and unhealthy foods) and the acceptability of ten eating-related intervention strategies. These strategies varied in type (either promoting healthy eating or discouraging unhealthy eating), level of intrusiveness, setting (home, school, broader out-of-home environment), and change agent (parents, teacher, policy makers). Based on adolescents' acceptability ratings, strategies could be clustered into two categories, those promoting healthy eating and those discouraging unhealthy eating, with acceptability rated significantly higher for the former. Acceptability of intervention strategies was rated moderate on average, but higher among girls, younger, overweight and immigrant adolescents, and those reporting healthier eating. Polish and Portuguese adolescents were overall more accepting of strategies than UK and Dutch adolescents. Adolescents preferred intervention strategies that promote healthy eating over strategies that discourage unhealthy eating. Level of intrusiveness affected acceptability ratings for the latter type of strategies only. Various individual and behavioral characteristics were associated with acceptability. These findings provide practical guidance for the selection of acceptable intervention strategies to improve adolescents' eating behavior.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 149 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 149 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 35 23%
Student > Ph. D. Student 21 14%
Researcher 19 13%
Student > Bachelor 19 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 4%
Other 16 11%
Unknown 33 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 27 18%
Psychology 24 16%
Medicine and Dentistry 17 11%
Social Sciences 15 10%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 5%
Other 16 11%
Unknown 42 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 August 2016.
All research outputs
#1,808,178
of 8,243,836 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#2,519
of 6,966 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#80,362
of 318,554 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#94
of 275 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,243,836 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 77th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,966 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.0. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 62% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 318,554 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 275 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 65% of its contemporaries.