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Patient-centred care, health behaviours and cardiovascular risk factor levels in people with recently diagnosed type 2 diabetes: 5-year follow-up of the ADDITION-Plus trial cohort

Overview of attention for article published in BMJ Open, January 2016
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  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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5 tweeters

Citations

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3 Dimensions

Readers on

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64 Mendeley
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Title
Patient-centred care, health behaviours and cardiovascular risk factor levels in people with recently diagnosed type 2 diabetes: 5-year follow-up of the ADDITION-Plus trial cohort
Published in
BMJ Open, January 2016
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2015-008931
Pubmed ID
Authors

Hajira Dambha-Miller, Andrew J M Cooper, Rebecca K Simmons, Ann Louise Kinmonth, Simon J Griffin

Abstract

To examine the association between the experience of patient-centred care (PCC), health behaviours and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factor levels among people with type 2 diabetes. Population-based prospective cohort study. 34 general practices in East Anglia, UK, delivering organised diabetes care. 478 patients recently diagnosed with type 2 diabetes aged between 40 and 69 years enrolled in the ADDITION-Plus trial. Self-reported and objectively measured health behaviours (diet, physical activity, smoking status), CVD risk factor levels (blood pressure, lipid levels, glycated haemoglobin, body mass index, waist circumference) and modelled 10-year CVD risk. Better experiences of PCC early in the course of living with diabetes were not associated with meaningful differences in self-reported physical activity levels including total activity energy expenditure (β-coefficient: 0.080 MET h/day (95% CI 0.017 to 0.143; p=0.01)), moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (β-coefficient: 5.328 min/day (95% CI 0.796 to 9.859; p=0.01)) and reduced sedentary time (β-coefficient: -1.633 min/day (95% CI -2.897 to -0.368; p=0.01)). PCC was not associated with clinically meaningful differences in levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (β-coefficient: 0.002 mmol/L (95% CI 0.001 to 0.004; p=0.03)), systolic blood pressure (β-coefficient: -0.561 mm Hg (95% CI -0.653 to -0.468; p=0.01)) or diastolic blood pressure (β-coefficient: -0.565 mm Hg (95% CI -0.654 to -0.476; p=0.01)). Over an extended follow-up of 5 years, we observed no clear evidence that PCC was associated with self-reported, clinical or biochemical outcomes, except for waist circumference (β-coefficient: 0.085 cm (95% CI 0.015 to 0.155; p=0.02)). We found little evidence that experience of PCC early in the course of diabetes was associated with clinically important changes in health-related behaviours or CVD risk factors. ISRCTN99175498; Post-results.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 64 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 64 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 11 17%
Student > Master 10 16%
Researcher 9 14%
Student > Bachelor 7 11%
Professor 6 9%
Other 21 33%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 19 30%
Unspecified 12 19%
Nursing and Health Professions 12 19%
Sports and Recreations 8 13%
Psychology 4 6%
Other 9 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 January 2016.
All research outputs
#4,014,748
of 13,465,341 outputs
Outputs from BMJ Open
#6,429
of 11,820 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#108,105
of 362,653 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMJ Open
#258
of 426 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,465,341 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 11,820 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 17.7. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 362,653 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 67% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 426 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.