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Mechanisms of Stress-Induced Visceral Pain: Implications in Irritable Bowel Syndrome

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Neuroendocrinology, August 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#10 of 1,095)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
119 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
19 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
92 Mendeley
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Title
Mechanisms of Stress-Induced Visceral Pain: Implications in Irritable Bowel Syndrome
Published in
Journal of Neuroendocrinology, August 2016
DOI 10.1111/jne.12361
Pubmed ID
Authors

B. Greenwood-Van Meerveld, R. D. Moloney, A. C. Johnson, M. Vicario

Abstract

Visceral pain describes pain originating from the internal organs of the body and is a common feature of many disorders including irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Stress is implicated in the development and exacerbation of many visceral pain disorders. Recent evidence suggests that stress and the gut microbiota can interact through complementary or opposing factors to influence visceral nociceptive behaviors. The presentation at this Young Investigator Forum at the International Society of Psychoneuroendocrinology (ISPNE) annual meeting described the experimental evidence by which the gut microbiota can affect the stress response to affect visceral pain. Building upon human imaging data showing abnormalities in that central processing of visceral stimuli in patients with IBS with the knowledge that the amygdala plays a pivotal role in facilitating the stress axis, we reviewed our latest experimental evidence supporting amygdala-mediated mechanisms in stress-induced visceral pain. The final part of the session at ISPNE reviewed experimental evidence that visceral pain in IBS may be due, at least in part, to afferent nerve sensitization following increases in epithelial permeability and mucosal immune activation. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 119 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 92 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 1%
Russia 1 1%
Unknown 90 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 17 18%
Researcher 17 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 16 17%
Student > Master 10 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 9%
Other 15 16%
Unknown 9 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 31 34%
Psychology 9 10%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 7%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 7%
Other 17 18%
Unknown 15 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 85. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 May 2017.
All research outputs
#338,794
of 19,519,615 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Neuroendocrinology
#10
of 1,095 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#7,964
of 389,986 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Neuroendocrinology
#1
of 12 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,519,615 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,095 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 389,986 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 12 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.