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Bone mineral density and its determinants in men with opioid dependence

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Bone & Mineral Metabolism, January 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (59th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (92nd percentile)

Mentioned by

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3 tweeters
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1 Google+ user

Citations

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14 Dimensions

Readers on

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28 Mendeley
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Title
Bone mineral density and its determinants in men with opioid dependence
Published in
Journal of Bone & Mineral Metabolism, January 2016
DOI 10.1007/s00774-015-0732-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Frank Gotthardt, Christine Huber, Clara Thierfelder, Leticia Grize, Marius Kraenzlin, Claude Scheidegger, Christian Meier

Abstract

Data on the influence of opioid substitution therapy (OST) on skeletal health in men is limited. This cross-sectional study aimed to determine the prevalence of low bone mass in male drug users and to evaluate the relationship between endogenous testosterone and bone mass. We recruited 144 men on long-term opioid maintenance therapy followed in the Center of Addiction Medicine in Basel, Switzerland. Data on medical and drug history, fracture risk and history of falls were collected. Bone mineral density (BMD) was evaluated by densitometry and serum was collected for measurements of gonadal hormones and bone markers. 35 healthy age- and BMI-matched men served as the control group. The study participants received OST with methadone (69 %), morphine (25 %) or buprenorphine (6 %). Overall, 74.3 % of men had low bone mass, with comparable bone mass irrespective of OST type. In older men (≥40 years, n = 106), 29.2 % of individuals were osteoporotic (mean T-score -3.0 ± 0.4 SD) and 48.1 % were diagnosed with osteopenia (mean T-score -1.7 ± 0.4 SD). In younger men (n = 38), 65.8 % of men had low bone mass. In all age groups, BMD was significantly lower than in age-and BMI-matched controls. In multivariate analyses, serum free testosterone (fT) was significantly associated with low BMD at the lumbar spine (p = 0.02), but not at the hip. When analysed by quartiles of fT, lumbar spine BMD decreased progressively with decreasing testosterone levels. We conclude that low bone mass is highly prevalent in middle-aged men on long-term opioid dependency, a finding which may partly be determined by partial androgen deficiency.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 28 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 28 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 5 18%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 14%
Student > Master 4 14%
Researcher 3 11%
Other 7 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 14 50%
Unspecified 4 14%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 11%
Business, Management and Accounting 2 7%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 4%
Other 4 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 January 2016.
All research outputs
#6,597,565
of 12,223,436 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Bone & Mineral Metabolism
#184
of 517 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#129,903
of 333,528 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Bone & Mineral Metabolism
#2
of 27 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,223,436 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 517 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.3. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 333,528 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 59% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 27 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.