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A human macrophage – hepatocyte co-culture model for comparative studies of infection and replication of Francisella tularensis LVS strain and subspecies holarctica and mediasiatica

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Microbiology, January 2016
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Title
A human macrophage – hepatocyte co-culture model for comparative studies of infection and replication of Francisella tularensis LVS strain and subspecies holarctica and mediasiatica
Published in
BMC Microbiology, January 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12866-015-0621-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Knut Rennert, Peter Otto, Harald Funke, Otmar Huber, Herbert Tomaso, Alexander S. Mosig

Abstract

Francisella tularensis, a gram-negative bacterium replicates intracellularly within macrophages and efficiently evades the innate immune response. It is able to infect and replicate within Kupffer cells, specialized tissue macrophages of the liver, and to modulate the immune response upon infection to its own advantage. Studies on Francisella tularensis liver infection were mostly performed in animal models and difficult to extrapolate to the human situation, since human infections and clinical observations are rare. Using a human co-culture model of macrophages and hepatocytes we investigated the course of infection of three Francisella tularensis strains (subspecies holarctica - wildtype and live vaccine strain, and mediasiatica - wildtype) and analyzed the immune response triggered upon infection. We observed that hepatocytes support the intracellular replication of Franciscella species in macrophages accompanied by a specific immune response inducing TNFα, IL-1β, IL-6 and fractalkine (CX3CL1) secretion and the induction of apoptosis. We could demonstrate that this human macrophage / hepatocyte co-culture model reflects strain-specific virulence of Francisella tularensis. We developed a suitable tool for more detailed in vitro studies on the immune response upon liver cell infection by F. tularensis.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 25 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 25 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 24%
Researcher 5 20%
Student > Master 4 16%
Unspecified 3 12%
Professor 2 8%
Other 5 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 24%
Unspecified 5 20%
Immunology and Microbiology 5 20%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 20%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 8%
Other 2 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 January 2016.
All research outputs
#5,931,804
of 6,920,439 outputs
Outputs from BMC Microbiology
#988
of 1,229 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#246,770
of 302,853 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Microbiology
#41
of 48 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,920,439 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,229 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.9. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 48 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.