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The role of childhood trauma in bipolar disorders

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Bipolar Disorders, January 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#3 of 205)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (96th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
8 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
41 tweeters
facebook
4 Facebook pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

dimensions_citation
108 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
269 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
The role of childhood trauma in bipolar disorders
Published in
International Journal of Bipolar Disorders, January 2016
DOI 10.1186/s40345-015-0042-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Monica Aas, Chantal Henry, Ole A. Andreassen, Frank Bellivier, Ingrid Melle, Bruno Etain

Abstract

This review will discuss the role of childhood trauma in bipolar disorders. Relevant studies were identified via Medline (PubMed) and PsycINFO databases published up to and including July 2015. This review contributes to a new understanding of the negative consequences of early life stress, as well as setting childhood trauma in a biological context of susceptibility and discussing novel long-term pathophysiological consequences in bipolar disorders. Childhood traumatic events are risk factors for developing bipolar disorders, in addition to a more severe clinical presentation over time (primarily an earlier age at onset and an increased risk of suicide attempt and substance misuse). Childhood trauma leads to alterations of affect regulation, impulse control, and cognitive functioning that might decrease the ability to cope with later stressors. Childhood trauma interacts with several genes belonging to several different biological pathways [Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, serotonergic transmission, neuroplasticity, immunity, calcium signaling, and circadian rhythms] to decrease the age at the onset of the disorder or increase the risk of suicide. Epigenetic factors may also be involved in the neurobiological consequences of childhood trauma in bipolar disorder. Biological sequelae such as chronic inflammation, sleep disturbance, or telomere shortening are potential mediators of the negative effects of childhood trauma in bipolar disorders, in particular with regard to physical health. The main clinical implication is to systematically assess childhood trauma in patients with bipolar disorders, or at least in those with a severe or instable course. The challenge for the next years will be to fill the gap between clinical and fundamental research and routine practice, since recommendations for managing this specific population are lacking. In particular, little is known on which psychotherapies should be provided or which targets therapists should focus on, as well as how childhood trauma could explain the resistance to mood stabilizers.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 41 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 269 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 2 <1%
Mexico 1 <1%
Unknown 266 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 45 17%
Student > Master 42 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 32 12%
Researcher 29 11%
Student > Postgraduate 20 7%
Other 53 20%
Unknown 48 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 78 29%
Medicine and Dentistry 60 22%
Neuroscience 22 8%
Nursing and Health Professions 13 5%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 10 4%
Other 28 10%
Unknown 58 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 105. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 August 2020.
All research outputs
#207,371
of 16,098,223 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Bipolar Disorders
#3
of 205 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#5,831
of 373,163 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Bipolar Disorders
#1
of 25 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,098,223 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 205 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 373,163 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 25 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.