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Solving the Problem: Genome Annotation Standards before the Data Deluge

Overview of attention for article published in Standards in Genomic Sciences, October 2011
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#12 of 240)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (87th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (78th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog

Citations

dimensions_citation
40 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
129 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
Solving the Problem: Genome Annotation Standards before the Data Deluge
Published in
Standards in Genomic Sciences, October 2011
DOI 10.4056/sigs.2084864
Pubmed ID
Authors

William Klimke, Claire O'Donovan, Owen White, J. Rodney Brister, Karen Clark, Boris Fedorov, Ilene Mizrachi, Kim D. Pruitt, Tatiana Tatusova

Abstract

The promise of genome sequencing was that the vast undiscovered country would be mapped out by comparison of the multitude of sequences available and would aid researchers in deciphering the role of each gene in every organism. Researchers recognize that there is a need for high quality data. However, different annotation procedures, numerous databases, and a diminishing percentage of experimentally determined gene functions have resulted in a spectrum of annotation quality. NCBI in collaboration with sequencing centers, archival databases, and researchers, has developed the first international annotation standards, a fundamental step in ensuring that high quality complete prokaryotic genomes are available as gold standard references. Highlights include the development of annotation assessment tools, community acceptance of protein naming standards, comparison of annotation resources to provide consistent annotation, and improved tracking of the evidence used to generate a particular annotation. The development of a set of minimal standards, including the requirement for annotated complete prokaryotic genomes to contain a full set of ribosomal RNAs, transfer RNAs, and proteins encoding core conserved functions, is an historic milestone. The use of these standards in existing genomes and future submissions will increase the quality of databases, enabling researchers to make accurate biological discoveries.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 129 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 4 3%
Brazil 3 2%
Canada 3 2%
Australia 3 2%
Sweden 1 <1%
Italy 1 <1%
Chile 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
France 1 <1%
Other 6 5%
Unknown 105 81%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 36 28%
Student > Ph. D. Student 34 26%
Student > Master 15 12%
Student > Bachelor 14 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 5%
Other 17 13%
Unknown 7 5%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 92 71%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 18 14%
Computer Science 4 3%
Immunology and Microbiology 3 2%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 2%
Other 2 2%
Unknown 8 6%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 December 2011.
All research outputs
#466,779
of 3,685,110 outputs
Outputs from Standards in Genomic Sciences
#12
of 240 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#27,983
of 231,518 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Standards in Genomic Sciences
#3
of 14 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 3,685,110 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 87th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 240 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 1.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 231,518 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 14 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its contemporaries.