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Role of information and communication networks in malaria survival

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, October 2007
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Title
Role of information and communication networks in malaria survival
Published in
Malaria Journal, October 2007
DOI 10.1186/1475-2875-6-136
Pubmed ID
Authors

Pallab Mozumder, Achla Marathe

Abstract

Quite often symptoms of malaria go unrecognized or untreated. According to the Multilateral Initiative on Malaria, 70% of the malaria cases that are treated at home are mismanaged. Up to 82% of all malaria episodes in sub-Saharan Africa are treated outside the formal health sector. Fast and appropriate diagnosis and treatment of malaria is extremely important in reducing morbidity and mortality. Data from 70 different countries is pooled together to construct a panel dataset of health and socio-economic variables for a time span of (1960-2004). The generalized two-stage least squares and panel data models are used to investigate the impact of information and communication network (ICN) variables on malaria death probability. The intensity of ICN is represented by the number of telephone main lines per 1,000 people and the number of television sets per 1,000 people. The major finding is that the intensity of ICN is associated with reduced probability of deaths of people that are clinically identified as malaria infected. The results are robust for both indicators i.e. interpersonal and mass communication networks and for all model specifications examined. The results suggest that information and communication networks can substantially scale up the effectiveness of the existing resources for malaria prevention. Resources spent in preventing malaria are far less than needed. Expanded information and communication networks will widen the avenues for community based "participatory development", that encourages the use of local information, knowledge and decision making. Timely information, immediate care and collective knowledge based treatment can be extremely important in reducing child mortality and achieving the millennium development goal.

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Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 46 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 4%
Indonesia 1 2%
Unknown 43 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 6 13%
Student > Master 6 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 11%
Student > Bachelor 5 11%
Professor 4 9%
Other 14 30%
Unknown 6 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 12 26%
Social Sciences 9 20%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 4%
Business, Management and Accounting 2 4%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 4%
Other 12 26%
Unknown 7 15%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 June 2018.
All research outputs
#13,220,363
of 22,840,638 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#3,355
of 5,572 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#59,729
of 72,039 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#8
of 11 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,840,638 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,572 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.8. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 72,039 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 11 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.