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Respiratory training as strategy to prevent cognitive decline in aging: a randomized controlled trial

Overview of attention for article published in Clinical Interventions in Aging, March 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (88th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (78th percentile)

Mentioned by

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1 news outlet
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8 X users
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

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23 Dimensions

Readers on

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236 Mendeley
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Title
Respiratory training as strategy to prevent cognitive decline in aging: a randomized controlled trial
Published in
Clinical Interventions in Aging, March 2015
DOI 10.2147/cia.s79560
Pubmed ID
Authors

Leandro Ferreira, Kátia Tanaka, Ruth Ferreira Santos-Galduróz, José Carlos Fernandes Galduróz

Abstract

Inadequate oxygenation may cause lesions and brain atrophy during aging. Studies show a positive association between pulmonary function and the cognitive performance of individuals from middle age on. To investigate the effect of aerobic physical exercises and respiratory training on the blood oxygenation, pulmonary functions, and cognition of the elderly. This was a randomized and controlled trial with three parallel groups. A total of 195 community-dwelling elderly were assessed for eligibility; only n=102 were included and allocated into the three groups, but after 6 months, n=68 were analyzed in the final sample. Participants were randomized into a social interaction group (the control group), an aerobic exercise group (the "walking" group), or a respiratory training group (the "breathing" group). The main outcome measures were the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale, Wechsler Memory Scale, Wisconsin Card Sorting Test, respiratory muscular strength, cirtometry (thoracic-abdominal circumference); oxygen saturation in arterial blood (SpO2), and hemogram. No differences were observed for any of the blood parameters. Aerobic exercise and respiratory training were effective in improving the pulmonary parameters. Better cognitive performance was observed for the breathing group as regards abstraction and mental flexibility. The walking group remained stable in the cognitive performance of most of the tests, except attention. The control group presented worst performance in mental manipulation of information, abstraction, mental flexibility, and attention. Our results showed that both the walking and breathing groups presented improvement of pulmonary function. However, only the breathing group showed improved cognitive function (abstraction, mental flexibility). The improvement in cognitive functions cannot be explained by blood parameters, such as SpO2, erythrocytes, hemoglobin, and hematocrit.

X Demographics

X Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 X users who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 236 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 2 <1%
Portugal 1 <1%
Unknown 233 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 44 19%
Student > Bachelor 33 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 27 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 22 9%
Researcher 20 8%
Other 31 13%
Unknown 59 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 40 17%
Medicine and Dentistry 38 16%
Nursing and Health Professions 32 14%
Sports and Recreations 22 9%
Neuroscience 11 5%
Other 22 9%
Unknown 71 30%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 14. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 February 2020.
All research outputs
#2,530,219
of 25,374,917 outputs
Outputs from Clinical Interventions in Aging
#267
of 1,968 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#30,772
of 270,989 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Clinical Interventions in Aging
#6
of 28 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 25,374,917 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 90th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,968 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.1. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 270,989 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 28 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its contemporaries.