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Nurses' reporting of suspect adverse drug reactions: a mixed-methods study.

Overview of attention for article published in Annali dell'Istituto Superiore di Sanità, October 2015
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Title
Nurses' reporting of suspect adverse drug reactions: a mixed-methods study.
Published in
Annali dell'Istituto Superiore di Sanità, October 2015
DOI 10.4415/ann_15_04_06
Pubmed ID
Authors

De Angelis, Alessia, Giusti, Angela, Colaceci, Sofia, Vellone, Ercole, Alvaro, Rosaria

Abstract

To assess nurses' knowledge, attitudes and practices (KAP) towards spontaneous adverse drug reactions (ADRs) reporting. The mixed-method study was conducted following a quanti-qualitative sequential approach: a survey (using a KAP questionnaire) followed by a focus group was performed. In the quantitative findings, responders (570 hospital nurses) declared that they were unaware of the pharmacovigilance system (58.1%, n = 331); where to find the reporting form (63.5%, n = 362); how fill it in (71.6%, n = 408); to whom and how to send it (65.8%, n = 375). Only 11.1% (n = 63) reported ADRs. The qualitative phase supported the quantitative findings and provided new information about other factors that condition ADR reporting: misinterpretation of the meaning of "reporting", unawareness of nurses' autonomy in ADR reporting and fear of consequences after ADR reporting. Nurses are not fully aware of their role in ADR reporting. We recommend educational interventions and management changes.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 3 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 3 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 7 233%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 167%
Researcher 4 133%
Student > Bachelor 3 100%
Lecturer > Senior Lecturer 2 67%
Other 6 200%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 12 400%
Medicine and Dentistry 8 267%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 5 167%
Linguistics 1 33%