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Sexual intercourse for cervical ripening and induction of labour

Overview of attention for article published in Cochrane database of systematic reviews, April 2001
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (94th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
52 tweeters
facebook
3 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
76 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
72 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
Sexual intercourse for cervical ripening and induction of labour
Published in
Cochrane database of systematic reviews, April 2001
DOI 10.1002/14651858.cd003093
Pubmed ID
Authors

Josephine Kavanagh, Anthony J Kelly, Jane Thomas

Abstract

The role of prostaglandins for cervical ripening and induction of labour has been examined extensively. Human semen is the biological source that is presumed to contain the highest prostaglandin concentration. The role of sexual intercourse in the initiation of labour is uncertain. The action of sexual intercourse in stimulating labour is unclear, it may in part be due to the physical stimulation of the lower uterine segment, or endogenous release of oxytocin as a result of orgasm or from the direct action of prostaglandins in semen. Furthermore nipple stimulation may be part of the process of initiation. This is one of a series of reviews of methods of cervical ripening and labour induction using standardised methodology. To determine the effects of sexual intercourse for third trimester cervical ripening or induction of labour in comparison with other methods of induction. The Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group trials register, the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register and bibliographies of relevant papers. Last searched: November 2000. (1) clinical trials comparing sexual intercourse for third trimester cervical ripening or labour induction with placebo/no treatment or other methods listed above it on a predefined list of labour induction methods; (2) random allocation to the treatment or control group; (3) adequate allocation concealment; (4) violations of allocated management not sufficient to materially affect conclusions; (5) clinically meaningful outcome measures reported; (6) data available for analysis according to the random allocation; (7) missing data insufficient to materially affect the conclusion. A strategy has been developed to deal with the large volume and complexity of trial data relating to labour induction. This involves a two-stage method of data extraction. There was one included study of 28 women which reported very limited data, from which no meaningful conclusions can be drawn. The role of sexual intercourse as a method of induction of labour is uncertain. Any future trials investigating sexual intercourse as a method of induction need to be of sufficient power to detect clinically relevant differences in standard outcomes. However, it may prove difficult to standardise sexual intercourse as an intervention to allow meaningful comparisons with other methods of induction of labour.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 52 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 72 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
France 1 1%
Ireland 1 1%
United States 1 1%
Canada 1 1%
Unknown 68 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 17 24%
Student > Bachelor 14 19%
Researcher 13 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 17%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 6%
Other 12 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 36 50%
Nursing and Health Professions 11 15%
Unspecified 8 11%
Social Sciences 4 6%
Psychology 4 6%
Other 9 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 74. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 September 2019.
All research outputs
#232,164
of 13,603,280 outputs
Outputs from Cochrane database of systematic reviews
#570
of 10,662 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2,058
of 210,264 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cochrane database of systematic reviews
#30
of 505 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,603,280 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 10,662 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 21.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 210,264 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 505 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.