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Differences in Energy Expenditures and Growth Dilution Explain Higher PCB Concentrations in Male Summer Flounder

Overview of attention for article published in PLoS ONE, January 2016
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Title
Differences in Energy Expenditures and Growth Dilution Explain Higher PCB Concentrations in Male Summer Flounder
Published in
PLoS ONE, January 2016
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0147223
Pubmed ID
Authors

Charles P. Madenjian, Olaf P. Jensen, Richard R. Rediske, James P. O’Keefe, Anthony R. Vastano, Steven A. Pothoven

Abstract

Comparison of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) concentrations between the sexes of mature fish may reveal important behavioral and physiological differences between the sexes. We determined whole-fish PCB concentrations in 23 female summer flounder Paralichthys dentatus and 27 male summer flounder from New Jersey coastal waters. To investigate the potential for differences in diet or habitat utilization between the sexes, carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios were also determined. In 5 of the 23 female summer flounder, PCB concentrations in the somatic tissue and ovaries were determined. In addition, we used bioenergetics modeling to assess the contribution of the growth dilution effect to the observed difference in PCB concentrations between the sexes. Whole-fish PCB concentrations for females and males averaged 87 and 124 ng/g, respectively; thus males were 43% higher in PCB concentration compared with females. Carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios did not significantly differ between the sexes, suggesting that diet composition and habitat utilization did not vary between the sexes. Based on PCB determinations in the somatic tissue and ovaries, we predicted that PCB concentration of females would increase by 0.6%, on average, immediately after spawning due to release of eggs. Thus, the change in PCB concentration due to release of eggs did not explain the higher PCB concentrations observed in males. Bioenergetics modeling results indicated that the growth dilution effect could account for males being 19% higher in PCB concentration compared with females. Thus, the bulk of the observed difference in PCB concentrations between the sexes was not explained by growth dilution. We concluded that a higher rate of energy expenditure in males, stemming from greater activity and a greater resting metabolic rate, was most likely the primary driver for the observed difference in PCB concentrations between the sexes.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 11 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Mexico 1 9%
United States 1 9%
Unknown 9 82%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 27%
Student > Master 2 18%
Researcher 2 18%
Unspecified 2 18%
Other 1 9%
Other 1 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 4 36%
Environmental Science 3 27%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 27%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 January 2016.
All research outputs
#5,249,027
of 7,017,937 outputs
Outputs from PLoS ONE
#75,503
of 103,080 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#218,381
of 317,598 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLoS ONE
#3,886
of 5,066 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,017,937 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 14th percentile – i.e., 14% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
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