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Fruit and vegetable consumption and all-cause mortality: evidence from a large Australian cohort study

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, January 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (87th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
7 news outlets
blogs
3 blogs
twitter
33 tweeters
facebook
8 Facebook pages
video
5 video uploaders

Citations

dimensions_citation
36 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
79 Mendeley
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Title
Fruit and vegetable consumption and all-cause mortality: evidence from a large Australian cohort study
Published in
International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, January 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12966-016-0334-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Binh Nguyen, Adrian Bauman, Joanne Gale, Emily Banks, Leonard Kritharides, Ding

Abstract

There is growing evidence for a relationship between fruit and vegetable consumption and all-cause mortality. Few studies, however, specifically explored consuming raw versus cooked vegetables in relation to health and mortality outcomes. The purpose of this study was to examine the relation of all-cause mortality with: a) fruit and vegetable consumption, either combined or separately; b) the consumption of raw versus cooked vegetables in a large cohort of Australian middle-aged and older adults. The sample included 150,969 adults aged 45 years and over from the 45 and Up Study, a prospective cohort study conducted in New South Wales, Australia. Self-reported baseline questionnaire data (2006-09) were linked to mortality data up to June 2014. Fruit and vegetable consumption was assessed by validated short questions. Crude and adjusted hazard ratios were calculated using Cox proportional hazard models. Covariates included socio-demographic characteristics, health-related and dietary variables. During a mean follow-up of 6.2 years, 6038 (4 %) participants died from all causes. In the fully adjusted models, increasing consumption of fruit and vegetables combined was associated with reductions in all-cause mortality, with the highest risk reduction seen up to 7 serves/day or more of fruit and vegetables (P for trend = 0.002, hazard ratio for highest versus lowest consumption quartile: 0.90; 95 % confidence interval: 0.84, 0.97). Separate consumption of fruit and vegetables, as well as consumption of raw or cooked vegetables, were associated with a reduced risk of all-cause mortality in the crude and minimally adjusted models (all P for trend <0.05). With the exception of raw vegetables, these associations remained significant in the fully adjusted models (all P for trend <0.05). Age and sex were significant effect modifiers of the association between fruit and vegetable consumption and all-cause mortality. Fruit and vegetable consumption were inversely related to all-cause mortality in this large Australian cohort. Further studies examining the effects of raw versus cooked vegetables are needed.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 33 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 79 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 1 1%
Unknown 78 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 19 24%
Student > Master 13 16%
Researcher 13 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 8%
Student > Postgraduate 6 8%
Other 12 15%
Unknown 10 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 17 22%
Medicine and Dentistry 15 19%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 10%
Social Sciences 8 10%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 6%
Other 12 15%
Unknown 14 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 100. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 May 2020.
All research outputs
#200,222
of 15,277,053 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
#54
of 1,518 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#5,995
of 341,926 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
#3
of 24 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,277,053 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,518 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 23.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 341,926 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 24 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.