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Hamstring stretch reflex: could it be a reproducible objective measure of functional knee stability?”

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Experimental Orthopaedics, January 2016
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Title
Hamstring stretch reflex: could it be a reproducible objective measure of functional knee stability?”
Published in
Journal of Experimental Orthopaedics, January 2016
DOI 10.1186/s40634-016-0040-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jawad F. Abulhasan, Cameron M. Anley, Martyn D. Snow, Michael J. Grey

Abstract

The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) plays an important role in anterior knee stability by preventing anterior translation of the tibia on the femur. Rapid translation of the tibia with respect to the femur produces an ACL-hamstring stretch reflex which may provide an object measure of neuromuscular function following ACL injury or reconstruction. The aim of this study was to determine if the ACL-hamstring stretch reflex could be reliably and consistently obtained using the KT-2000 arthrometer. A KT-2000 arthrometer was used to translate the tibia on the femur while recording the electromyography over the biceps femoris muscle in 20 participants, all with intact ACLs. In addition, a sub-group comprising 4 patients undergoing a knee arthroscopy for meniscal pathology, were tested before and after anaesthetic and with direct traction on the ACL during arthroscopy. The remaining 16 participants underwent testing to elicit the reflex using the KT-2000 only. A total number of 182 trials were performed from which 70 trials elicited stretch reflex (38.5 %). The mean onset latency of the hamstring stretch reflexes was 58.9 ± 17.9 ms. The average pull force was 195 ± 47 N, stretch velocity 48 ± 35 mm/s and rate of force 19.7 ± 6.4 N/s. Based on these results, we concluded that the response rate of the anterior cruciate ligament-hamstring reflex is too low for it to be reliably used in a clinical setting, and thus would have limited value in assessing the return of neuromuscular function following ACL injuries.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 28 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Korea, Republic of 1 4%
Unknown 27 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 8 29%
Student > Bachelor 5 18%
Professor 4 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 14%
Researcher 2 7%
Other 3 11%
Unknown 2 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 11 39%
Sports and Recreations 6 21%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 7%
Materials Science 2 7%
Social Sciences 1 4%
Other 2 7%
Unknown 4 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 January 2016.
All research outputs
#3,516,710
of 7,062,006 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Experimental Orthopaedics
#9
of 21 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#166,527
of 319,030 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Experimental Orthopaedics
#2
of 6 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,062,006 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 21 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.4. This one scored the same or higher as 12 of them.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 319,030 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 6 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 4 of them.