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Elevated glycated hemoglobin levels impair blood pressure in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus

Overview of attention for article published in Diabetology & Metabolic Syndrome, January 2016
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Title
Elevated glycated hemoglobin levels impair blood pressure in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus
Published in
Diabetology & Metabolic Syndrome, January 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13098-015-0118-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sandra de Oliveira, Dahan da Cunha Nascimento, Ramires Alsamir Tibana, Samuel Lima de Oliveira, Ivo Vieira de Sousa Neto, Roberta Kelly Menezes Maciel Falleiros, Leonardo Garcia Miranda, Hermelinda Cordeiro Pedrosa, James Wilfred Navalta, Guilherme Borges Pereira, Jonato Prestes

Abstract

Deregulation of glycemic and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1) levels accelerate the progression of cardiovascular complications in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). The aim of this study was to investigate the association between HbA1 and changes in blood pressure of children and adolescents with T1DM. A total of 60 children and adolescents were recruited and allocated into two groups (prehypertension and control group). Blood pressure and HbA1 were measured by the oscillometric method and high-performance liquid chromatography, respectively. The prehypertensive group had (P < 0.05) higher disease duration, body weight, Z score for body weight, systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and a higher HbA1 when compared with the control children and adolescents. Multiple regression to predict alterations in DBP from HbA1 adjusted for age, disease duration, and body mass index demonstrated a positive relationship with DBP (P < 0.05). A 1 % increase in HbA1 was associated with 1.73 mmHg increase in DBP. High levels of HbA1 may be associated with increased blood pressure in T1DM. A tight control of HbA1 levels may provide long-term cardiovascular protection in children and adolescents with T1DM.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 28 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 28 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 6 21%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 7%
Other 2 7%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 4%
Student > Bachelor 1 4%
Other 2 7%
Unknown 14 50%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 7 25%
Psychology 1 4%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 4%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 4%
Sports and Recreations 1 4%
Other 2 7%
Unknown 15 54%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 31 January 2016.
All research outputs
#5,295,097
of 7,066,845 outputs
Outputs from Diabetology & Metabolic Syndrome
#171
of 255 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#220,826
of 320,225 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Diabetology & Metabolic Syndrome
#10
of 15 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,066,845 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 14th percentile – i.e., 14% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 255 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.6. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 320,225 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 15 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.