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Rumination and behavioural factors in Parkinson's disease depression

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Psychosomatic Research, March 2016
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (65th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (60th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
5 tweeters

Citations

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8 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
70 Mendeley
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Title
Rumination and behavioural factors in Parkinson's disease depression
Published in
Journal of Psychosomatic Research, March 2016
DOI 10.1016/j.jpsychores.2016.01.008
Pubmed ID
Authors

Camille L. Julien, Katharine A. Rimes, Richard G. Brown

Abstract

Parkinson's disease is associated with high rates of depression. There is growing interest in non-pharmacological management including psychological approaches such as Cognitive Behaviour Therapy. To date, little research has investigated whether processes that underpin cognitive models of depression, on which such treatment is based, apply in patients with Parkinson's disease. The study aimed to investigate the contribution of core psychological factors to the presence and degree of depressive symptoms. 104 participants completed questionnaires measuring mood, motor disability and core psychological variables, including maladaptive assumptions, rumination, cognitive-behavioural avoidance, illness representations and cognitive-behavioural responses to symptoms. Regression analyses revealed that a small number of psychological factors accounted for the majority of depression variance, over and above that explained by overall disability. Participants reporting high levels of rumination, avoidance and symptom focusing experienced more severe depressive symptoms. In contrast, pervasive negative dysfunctional beliefs did not independently contribute to depression variance. Specific cognitive (rumination and symptom focusing) and behavioural (avoidance) processes may be key psychological markers of depression in Parkinson's disease and therefore offer important targets for tailored psychological interventions.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 70 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
India 1 1%
Colombia 1 1%
Unknown 68 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 21%
Student > Bachelor 12 17%
Student > Master 12 17%
Researcher 7 10%
Other 5 7%
Other 14 20%
Unknown 5 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 29 41%
Medicine and Dentistry 9 13%
Neuroscience 6 9%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 9%
Social Sciences 3 4%
Other 10 14%
Unknown 7 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 March 2016.
All research outputs
#6,214,293
of 12,299,194 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Psychosomatic Research
#1,018
of 1,632 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#115,684
of 343,861 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Psychosomatic Research
#6
of 15 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,299,194 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,632 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.3. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 343,861 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 65% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 15 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its contemporaries.