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The ‘rural pipeline’ and retention of rural health professionals in Europe's northern peripheries

Overview of attention for article published in Health Policy, December 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (86th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (84th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
14 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
13 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
38 Mendeley
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Title
The ‘rural pipeline’ and retention of rural health professionals in Europe's northern peripheries
Published in
Health Policy, December 2015
DOI 10.1016/j.healthpol.2015.08.001
Pubmed ID
Authors

Dean B. Carson, Adrian Schoo, Peter Berggren

Abstract

The major advance in informing rural workforce policy internationally over the past 25 years has been the recognition of the importance of the 'rural pipeline'. The rural pipeline suggests that people with 'rural origin' (who spent some childhood years in rural areas) and/or 'rural exposure' (who do part of their professional training in rural areas) are more likely to select rural work locations. What is not known is whether the rural pipeline also increases the length of time professionals spend in rural practice throughout their careers. This paper analyses data from a survey of rural health professionals in six countries in the northern periphery of Europe in 2013 to examine the relationship between rural origin and rural exposure and the intention to remain in the current rural job or to preference rural jobs in future. Results are compared between countries, between different types of rural areas (based on accessibility to urban centres), different occupations and workers at different stages of their careers. The research concludes that overall the pipeline does impact on retention, and that both rural origin and rural exposure make a contribution. However, the relationship is not strong in all contexts, and health workforce policy should recognise that retention may in some cases be improved by recruiting beyond the pipeline.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 14 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 38 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Indonesia 1 3%
Portugal 1 3%
Peru 1 3%
Unknown 35 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 7 18%
Researcher 5 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 8%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 8%
Student > Bachelor 3 8%
Other 10 26%
Unknown 7 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 10 26%
Social Sciences 7 18%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 11%
Business, Management and Accounting 4 11%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 2 5%
Other 4 11%
Unknown 7 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 11. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 February 2016.
All research outputs
#1,218,634
of 12,232,536 outputs
Outputs from Health Policy
#182
of 1,616 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#44,927
of 344,691 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Health Policy
#4
of 26 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,232,536 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 90th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,616 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.6. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 344,691 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 26 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.